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Today's News

  • Road funds face long-term trouble

    The bad news about state finances comes so often, it’s hard to pay attention sometimes. The latest bad news comes from the New Mexico Department of Transportation, which is warning local governments to expect cuts in money for local road projects because of declines in the state road and local government road funds.

    In a letter sent to local government road fund program participants, the department asks the participants to review projects to determine which can be downsized or postponed. School bus routes, city streets and equipment are all on the chopping block.

  • Legislative squeeze play approaches

    Tenth Night came and on the Eleventh Day, the picture emerged for the 2010 session of the Legislature that begins Jan. 19.

    The Legislative Finance Committee got there first with a 14-page outline released Jan. 4. A day later, Gov. Bill Richardson proposed, as his news release put it, “a responsible, balanced budget” with 5 percent reserves.

  • UNM-LA uses science to study today’s urgent issues

    The University of New Mexico-Los Alamos (UNM-LA) is launching a new course in ecological economics, for the spring semester.

    The course, Topics: Ecological Economics (GNST 192, will meet from 11 a.m.-12:40 p.m. Fridays from Jan. 22 through March 12 and will be graded “credit/no credit.”

  • Haitian earthquake leaves thousdands dead and missing, capital city in ruins

    PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti (AP) — Haitians piled bodies along the devastated streets of their capital Wednesday after a powerful earthquake flattened the president's palace, hospitals, schools, the main prison and thousands of homes. Untold numbers were still trapped.

    President Rene Preval said he believes thousands of people were dead from Tuesday afternoon's magnitude-7.0 quake.

  • News alert: Council votes to simplify downtown zoning, approves bridge for Canyon Rim Trail
  • Richardson wants to set course for green economy

    ALBUQUERQUE — Gov. Bill Richardson has signed an executive order he says will set a course for the state as it establishes an economy based on clean, renewable energy.

    The governor says New Mexico is blessed with oil and natural gas, but will have to take full advantage of its wind, solar, geothermal and biofuels resources if it wants to continue creating jobs.

    Richardson says his executive order focuses on growing research and manufacturing in the renewable energy industry.

  • Council votes to simplify downtown plan

    “The downtown plan, as it exists, is impossible to work with,” said Rick Bohn, Los Alamos County community development director.

    At Tuesday’s county council meeting in White Rock, Bohn explained three ordinance amendments intended to simplify the planning and zoning process by eliminating ambiguous language between documents that may have an impact on land use.

  • Thinking’ like an iPod

    Teenagers today live in a world where having choices is the norm. For instance, Los Alamos High School English teacher Margo Batha explained nowadays, when youngsters listen to music on their iPods, they can select which songs to listen to and which ones to ignore. This example supports the fact that having choices is an intrinsic part of young people’s lives.

    During the school board meeting Tuesday night, a group of English teachers showed how they are following the iPod’s lead.

  • This whole darn decade has a year to go

    SANTA FE — Hooray. We still have a year to redeem the first decade of the 21st century from being a complete bust.

    Reader Earl Nielsen, of Alamogordo, recalled that 10 years ago, I participated in the effort to remind the world that the decade, century and millennium didn’t end on Dec. 31, 1999. It ended a year later.

  • Boys basketball: Toppers survive late scare to hold off Sartans at home, 73-65

    Midway through the third quarter of Tuesday night’s ballgame, the Los Alamos Hilltopper boys basketball team appeared to have everything well in-hand.

    With a little less than a minute remaining in that same ballgame, things were very much up in the air.