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Today's News

  • Giving help to the world

    When it comes to humanitarian work, there is never a lapse on things to do. Jean and John Lyman know this first hand; whether it is helping out rice farmers in Cambodia or volunteering at the Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints church in England, the Lymans have traveled the globe to offer their services.

  • Schools hope to get financial assistance

    It’s common knowledge that Los Alamos County is considered the wealthiest county in the state. Because of that, it’s widely assumed Los Alamos Public Schools is amply funded as well.

    But that’s not the case, according to local school officials who explained during a recent interview why the district is struggling and why it is critical that the community approve the upcoming referendum election.

  • Diamond Drive project begins final lap

    It’s going to take nearly two more years. It won’t be easy. But when it’s over, it will be over for a long time.

    “There will be congestion; it will be inconvenient,” said Kyle Zimmerman, Los Alamos County department of public works director. “We will try to minimize it, but there will be delays and disruption.”

    He was talking about Phase 4 of the Diamond Drive project that began at the San Ildefonso roundabout and will extend to the Los Alamos Canyon Bridge, skipping north and south across the mesa tops.

  • County slams the brakes on bus service Friday

    Some Atomic City Transit riders were caught by surprise and without public transportation this morning. ACT stopped service of all its buses with the exception of Dial-a-ride, following the investigation of the Nov. 18 traffic accident that killed Logan Collins, 12, near Los Alamos Middle School.

  • It’s going to be a great year

    You can tell it’s going to be a bad day when you wake up to find that your waterbed sprung a leak during the night. You can tell it’s going to be an even worse day when you remember that you don’t own a waterbed. Some days are better than others and some years are pretty much the same.

    But this is going to be a great year.

  • Love is in the air

    The Los Alamos Arts Council gets romantic with its newest concert, which features soprano Viera Moore, violinist David Moore and pianist Cindy Little. The show will be held at 12:30 p.m. Wednesday at Fuller Lodge.

  • A good story to sink your teeth into

    When “Fried Green Tomatoes” came out in 1991, every woman in America loved it. It was immediately heralded as the ultimate “chick flick,” and no wonder. It has four strong female leads.

    It focuses on women’s stories and women’s problems. It features a really lovely man, who dies, and an absolutely terrible man, who also dies. Men didn’t like the film much at all.

  • Council chooses Wismer as chair

    There was uncertainty but no surprise as Los Alamos County Council appointed a new chair Tuesday night. Mike Wismer, a political independent, was the unanimous choice to become the next chairman, moving up after serving as vice chair last year.

    He succeeds former chair Mike Wheeler who attended the meeting in a wheelchair after a ski hill accident over the holidays.

    Moments later, Sharon Stover was nominated and unanimously elected vice chair.

    Selecting a new chair and vice chair on the council occurs at the beginning of every year.

  • Lucky lab engineers to share $200K lottery winnings

    LOS ALAMOS, N.M. (AP) — A dozen Los Alamos National Laboratory employees have claimed a $200,000 prize that one of them announced to the others in a three-page PowerPoint presentation.

    Shean Monahan, who bought the ticket, says the announcement caused whoops and hollers, but one winner thought it was a joke.

    The 11 engineers and their administrative assistant had chipped in so Monahan could buy 10 tickets for the Jan. 2 drawing.

    Monahan discovered the $200,000 prize Monday night, but decided it was too late to call the others.

  • December retail sales offer glimmer of hope for nation's merchants

    NEW YORK (AP) — Last-minute holiday shoppers brought relief to the nation's retailers, handing them modest sales gains for the holiday season and prompting several to raise their fourth-quarter profit outlooks.

    The improved profit picture comes because retailers never had to resort to drastic price-cutting after keeping inventories lean.

    Still, retailers are facing tough months ahead as consumer spending is expected to remain weak amid high unemployment and tight credit.