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Today's News

  • Questions remain about warming

    The letter by Charles Chick Keller “Let science make the call on climate,” Jan 5, 2010 was welcomed by me. I was waiting for an opinion by a local scientist in this science-rich town of Los Alamos.

    I agree that the warming is real, but the statement that there has been “ no warming in the past eight years,” is pretty mild when the data shows a cooling trend that is equivalent to 2 degrees Celsius per century. How long does this go on before we change our minds about global warming?

  • Don't hit pets and run

    On Tuesday, Dec. 24 at about 3 p.m., my Basset Hound, Gracie, was killed on the corner of 44th St. and Sandia in the Western Area right in front of my house. Whoever hit her, didn’t even stop.

  • Time to revisit term limits

    Watching the antics of the United States Senate these past few weeks, I was struck by images of old men moving slowly and deliberately, afraid to go too quickly in any direction for fear of losing a campaign dollar or a vote.

    In every other American venue, new blood is regularly infused to keep up with changes in population, needs and attitudes. Not so in the Senate, where experience becomes a liability when it inhibits innovation and progress, and when senators’ ideas take on the color of their longtime sponsors.

  • What a difference a decade makes

    When you are 20 years old, 10 years is half your lifetime, and time moves slowly. However, when you’re an older adult,

    10 years fly by at a speed that is unsettling. How has Los Alamos’ view of the environment changed in the last 10 years?

    The evolution of PEEC and Earth Day celebrations offers a frame of reference.

  • Los Alamos jurist seeks fourth term on the bench

    Incumbent Alan Kirk is running for reelection as Municipal Court judge. He has served three consecutive four-year terms.  “I’d like to continue presiding over the court that we’ve developed. We have a very good staff and I think we provide a very high level of service to the community,” Kirk said.

    Adjudicating cases can be interesting, he said, adding that it can be a challenge sometimes in reaching the best decision and rendering the fairest sentence.

  • 01-10-10 Update

    UNM-LA Board meeting

       The University of New Mexico-Los Alamos Advisory Board will meet at 5:30 p.m.  Monday in the lecture hall.

    LWV luncheon

       The Los Alamos League of Women Voters will begin the year 2010 with State District Attorney Angela “Spence” Pacheco as the speaker at the monthly Lunch with a Leader meeting. This monthly event will be held from 11:45 a.m.-12:45 p.m. Tuesday at the Central Avenue Grill. Everything on the extensive menu is just $13.50 (includes meal, drink, tax, tip).

  • Making budget cuts, kind and otherwise

    Sometimes a statistic knocks at your door.

    This one was an attractive, well-spoken, 40-something woman.

    “My husband and I were laid off last month. I can do cleaning, and he can do yard work,” she said, handing me a flyer.

    I could have used her help, but like a lot of other self-employed people, I’ve seen my work thin out lately.

  • A county tax cut may be coming

    Voters considering the UNM-LA operating mil levy and LA Public Schools (LAPS) bond renewal should be aware of a potentially important county council action that may lower the county portion of our property taxes.

  • Man dies in shootout with state police

    CORDOVA, N.M. (AP) — A New Mexico State Police spokesman says a Cordova man was killed after exchanging gunfire with state police officers Sunday at his home.

    Spokesman Peter Olson says 58-year-old Luis Montoya was killed after he fired a rifle at officers who were checking on his welfare at his home.

    Montoya was removed from the Ohkay Casino near Espanola after threatening to shoot tribal police and security officers.

    State police officers were asked to check on Montoya's welfare.

  • Analysis: Stimulus spending on infrastructure projects fails to move unemployment needle

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Ten months into President Barack Obama's first economic stimulus plan, a surge in spending on roads and bridges has had no effect on local unemployment and only barely helped the beleaguered construction industry, an Associated Press analysis has found.