.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • NEWS UPDATE: SWEET TREATS TO HELP HAITI

    Ms. Spence's sixth grade GATE class, Heart to Heart, will host a bake sale from 12:30-4 p.m. Wednesday in the Los Alamos National Bank lobby. All proceeds will go to the American Red Cross to benefit the victims of the Haitian earthquake. 

  • News Advisory: Probate judge to seek full term

  • Probate judge to seek full term

    Three months into the job and Y. Ellen Hong said she thoroughly enjoys the work and definitely wants to be elected to a full term as Los Alamos County probate judge.

    “It is what I expected and I find it interesting and a good fit with my background and abilities,” Hong said. “I also feel this is an opportunity to do public service. I’m semi-retired and had been looking for a way to serve the community when this position became available.”

  • News Alert: Local home fills with carbon monoxide, four children and mom survive

    Anyone living without carbon monoxide detectors in their home may rethink that decision after reading what happened this weekend to Los Alamos County employee Leslie Bucklin and her four daughters.

    Normally the entire family is deep asleep by 11 p.m., but Sunday night Bucklin and her 17-year-old daughter were rearranging furniture on the main floor of their four-story condo as the other children slept upstairs.

    They didn't notice their home filling with carbon monoxide. There was no odor. There were no fumes.

  • Boys basketball: LA falls to Espaola Valley in front of big crowd Friday night

    In order to knock off the second-ranked team in the state, the Los Alamos Hilltopper boys basketball team needed to play a flawless game Friday night.

    The third quarter of Friday’s game, however, was far less than flawless.

    With the Hilltoppers playing in front of a packed house at Griffith Gymnasium Friday night, they played nearly even with the powerful Española Valley Sundevils and trailed by just four at the half.

  • Girls basketball: Topper comeback try falls short

    ESPAÑOLA — A pair of four-minute stretches, which happened nearly a full game in between, doomed the Los Alamos Hilltopper girls basketball team Saturday night.

    In a critical early District 2AAAA contest Saturday, the Española Valley Sundevils jumped out to a huge early lead and survived a big Hilltopper push in the final quarter, in which they cut the Sundevil lead down to just one point. But with the Hilltoppers poised to take the lead late, the offense, which appeared to be finally getting cranked up, started to sputter.

  • Wrestling: LA gets back into action after layoff

    After being snowed out of competition last weekend and having an abbreviated practice schedule this week, the Los Alamos Hilltopper wrestling team faced a stiff test this weekend in Las Vegas.

    Los Alamos was one of 22 teams taking part in the two-day Las Vegas Robertson Invitational, a high-level individual competition hosted by one of the marquee Class AAA programs in the state.

    At the tournament, which started Friday, Hilltoppers Desmond Fellers and Gary Thorne both moved to the gold bracket of the tournament, although neither advanced in the top bracket.

  • Hilltoppers get ‘Lost in the Lab’

    The LAHS Olions Thespian Club has traveled to some interesting places in their shows, but none quite as outrageous as this year’s ’Topper Revue destination: the Los Alamos National Laboratory. In fact, the lab is such an unusual location that the emcees get lost.

    “We chose the theme, ‘Lost in the Lab’ because it is something our whole town can enjoy,” emcee Josh Dolin said. “Los Alamos is centered around the lab.”

  • Maralyn Budke: Wisdom, grace and public service

    Former Gov. Garrey Carruthers once ranked Maralyn Budke alongside our “finest governors, senators and congressmen” in terms of her public service “contributions to our state.”  

    I knew of Maralyn Budke’s lustrous reputation well before we first met on the morning of Nov. 5, 1986.

  • What makes a good politician?

    Members of Congress play a central role in our lives. They shape our health-care system, make crucial decisions about the U.S. economy, and represent the hopes and interests of every American in Washington. Given this fact, I’m always surprised that relatively little attention is focused on examining closely whether someone serving in or running for Congress has the personal attributes it takes to be an effective member of the institution. If someone’s behavior is shady or unsavory, that will make the news.