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Today's News

  • Wake up, America

    Several alarming things are happening in our country.  As we go about our daily work, Congress continues spending money that we don’t have.

  • Owning a piece of the American dream

    For many of us, sleeping every night in a safe and comfortable home is something we take for granted — but that’s not the case for all families. However, for those families there are opportunities to buy a house to call home — even in these trying economic times.

    Several Federal agencies have proclaimed June National Homeownership Month. This month we recognize the role homeownership plays as the foundation of America’s economy and how it provides stability in our communities.

  • N.M. doesn’t need a Plum Book

    SANTA FE — “If I’m elected governor, I’ll fire every single political appointee.” Sound familiar? You’ve likely heard that promise from every single gubernatorial candidate for almost a year.

    We’re down to only two candidates now and this is one campaign promise you can expect either of them to keep. Governors always do. They want their own trusted individuals around them, not the former governor’s buddies.

  • LAPS Foundation awards scholarships

    Here are the additional students who received the LAPS Foundation scholarship.

  • Golf: Tiger says game is progressing for US Open

    PEBBLE BEACH, Calif. (AP) — The one shot that got so much attention during practice 10 years ago at Pebble Beach was a 4-iron that Tiger Woods hit so high, so straight, so flush that it landed softly near the pin on a brick-hard green at the par-3 12th.

    That wasn't the case Tuesday at the U.S. Open.

    There is not much about Woods that looks the same as it once did.

    "Tiger!" he muttered to himself as his 4-iron sailed weakly to the left of the 12th green, closer to the gallery than the pin.

  • Report: Employers to see 2011 medical costs jump

    INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Companies that offer employee health insurance expect another steep jump in medical costs next year, and more will ask workers to share a bigger chunk of the expense, according to a new PricewaterhouseCoopers report.

    For the first time, most of the American workforce is expected to have health insurance deductibles of $400 or more, the consulting firm said in a report released to The Associated Press.

  • LAPS to get share of $4.5 million in grant money for solar project

    The Los Alamos Public Schools will be one of the districts chosen by Governor Bill Richardson to receive a grant for construction of a solar farm. The photovoltaic array is expected to be built near the middle school on North Mesa.

    LAPS Superintendent Gene Schmidt said the district is still awaiting the formal funding letter, but indicated that he expects the grant to be somewhere in the $250,000 to $300,000 range. Gov. Richardson announced the grants last Wednesday, and that the total $4.5 million in funding comes from federal stimulus money.

  • Firefighters battle three blazes in Santa Fe National Forest

    ESPANOLA, N.M. (AP) — Authorities say a wildfire in Santa Fe National Forest has spread across more than 5,000 acres.

    The South Fork Fire is one of three fires burning Monday on the northern New Mexico forest.

    Three helicopters dropped water for several hours Sunday to try to contain the 5,143-acre, lightning-caused blaze but it continued to spread. Firefighters closed off a large area surrounding the fire.

  • Cop is suspect in burglary

    Longtime Los Alamos Police Det. Shari (Sharon)  Mills, 53, is the prime suspect in an aggravated burglary case at the home of her former husband, Lt. Scott Mills, also a Los Alamos police officer.

    Officers took photographs and dusted for fingerprints at Lt. Mills’ home at 1415 41st St., Thursday evening.

    LAPD Chief Wayne Torpy called in New Mexico State Police to investigate the case after Det. Mills became a suspect.

  • Screaming doesn’t always help

    SANTA FE — Last week a truly amazing event occurred in the world of sports. Detroit’s Armando Galarraga pitched a perfect game. He threw to the minimum 27 hitters and didn’t let anyone get to first base. It had only happened 20 times previously in the 134-year history of Major League Baseball.

    There was only one catch. Umpire Jim Joyce called the final batter safe at first. Baseball doesn’t have instant replay as pro football and basketball do, so the decision stood.