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Today's News

  • Still on standby for the new arrival

    Right now, my unborn baby ripples along the sweeping circumference of my belly. She strains against the wall of me dozens of times each day. She stretches her long legs, steamrolling my tiny sour stomach with her delicate feet. Soon, either she will outgrow her house, or I will outgrow mine.

    It’s distracting.

  • Los Alamos native returns to the Santa Fe Opera stage

    This year is a record year for The Santa Fe Opera’s Apprentice Singer Program. In all,  1,498 young singers applied and 38 were chosen to come to New Mexico from as far away as Venezuela, Spain, Louisiana, Washington and Pennsylvania to perform with The Santa Fe Opera during its 54th season.

    Although the program has attracted an international crowd, a local face can also be spotted on the opera’s stage.

  • Running: Clark, Finkel win 50-mile race at Trail Runs

    Nick Clark bested fellow Fort Collins, Colo., resident Ryan Burch to win the 2010 Jemez Mountain Trail Runs 50-mile race.

    The Jemez Mountain Trail Runs, which feature a 50-mile, 50-kilomenter and half marathon, were run May 22. The courses run through the hills around Los Alamos.

    In all, 653 runners entered the race this year, with about 30 percent of those braving the 50-mile trek. Of the 193 that started the 50-mile race, 100 finished the course.

    The most popular race this year, with 289 entrants was the half-marathon.

  • The Scots arrive to play at Ashley Pond

    The Summer Concert Series continues at 7 p.m. Friday at Ashley Pond with the one of Scotland’s best traditional and neo-traditional bands, Old Blind Dogs.

    I promise it’ll be a tremendous show. They’ll play jigs, reels, love songs and ballads. The Los Angeles Times reported the Old Blind Dogs brings “freshness and color to acoustic music steeped in centuries of Scottish folklore and history.”

  • ‘Net surfer injured

    A quiet evening turned nightmarish for an Arkansas man sitting on the lower front steps at UNM-Los Alamos about 8:45 p.m. Sunday.

    Jerry Plumlee was at the campus capturing a WiFi signal and working on his laptop for about 10 minutes when an instant later he found himself battered and bruised.

  • Cavasos’ life touched many

    As word spread within the last 18 hours that Gary Cavasos died in a plane crash, family, colleagues and friends have tried to summon the words to describe a man they admired, respected and loved.

    “Gary was a family man — he loved his family so much — his passion was flying and his wife and his kids,” said younger brother David Morales. “I’ve known him for the 40 years I’ve been alive and he was a wonderful brother and he would give the shirt off his back to anybody.”

  • An open letter to Bingman, Udall and Teague

    Will we be able to secure the U. S./Mexico border, or will it be impossible? With the U. S. Border Patrol denied access for routine patrol in federally designated wilderness areas along Arizona’s border and with new corridors and safe havens for illegal activities in wilderness along the border in New Mexico, how would securing the border be possible?

  • Media to be or media not to be

    KRSN AM 1490 is Los Alamos’ radio station. It has been here since 1947.

    It has been a part of the fabric of this community for 63 years. It entertained Manhattan scientists after long days of inquiry. It grew to include news, sports and entertainment. It grew to be “the talk of the town.” It is a piece of living history continuing to bring you news, sports and entertainment.

  • Latest blunder feeds frustration in the Gulf

    NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Earlier this month, BP boldly predicted the oil gushing from the bottom of the sea would be reduced to a "relative trickle" within days, and President Barack Obama told the nation last week that as much as 90 percent would soon be captured. But those goals seemed wildly optimistic Thursday after yet another setback a mile underwater.

  • Sticking points keep work going on Wall St. bill

    WASHINGTON (AP) — House and Senate negotiators struggled to meet a self-imposed Thursday deadline to wrap up a massive financial regulation bill, with two major sticking points standing in the way of completing legislation that has been one year in the making.

    Sen. Chris Dodd, D-Conn., chairman of the Senate Banking Committee, huddled with fellow senators to resolve disputes over how far to go in restricting banks from engaging in securities deals.