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Today's News

  • Historic Society looks for guidance

    For 42 years, the Los Alamos Historical Society has operated the Los Alamos History Museum but as the society turns its attention to the house formerly owned by Dr. J. Robert Oppenheimer, it finds itself in unfamiliar territory.

    Fortunately, the historic society earned a $3,750 grant from the New Mexico Humanities Council as well as a $2,400 grant from the National Trust for Historic Preservation. These grants will offer guidance to the society as it begins initial steps to operate a historic home museum.

  • ‘Magic Flute’ emits a lack luster note

    After the excitement, sturm und drang of Friday night’s season opening, Saturday’s second opening felt more relaxed, less crowded, more casual, less pressured  and the weather was calmer, too.  

    Mozart’s “The Magic Flute” (1791) is the ultimate kid friendly opera, and we did indeed see several beautiful little girls in beautiful little dresses; but I’m sorry to say this production will leave the kids bored instead of dazzled.

  • Lab nabs top tech awards

    A super high speed camera.

    Green explosives.

    A way to pull fuel from algae using sound waves.

    Those are a few of the projects that netted five top awards for Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists.

    The R&D Magazine’s R&D 100 Awards honor the top 100 proven technological advances of the past year.

    “This work benefits us all by enhancing America’s competitiveness, ensuring our security, providing new energy solutions and expanding the frontiers of our knowledge,” said Energy Secretary Steven Chu, in a news release.

  • DPS move will slow crime, save money

    The Department of Public Safety Forensic Laboratory will assume control of the State DNA Administrative Center starting in October — a move  that will trim weeks when inputting felon DNA information into the statewide database and save about $400,000 a year, according to the DPS.

    Today it takes six to eight weeks for this DNA information to be entered into the database for law enforcement use.

    DPS estimates it will take about two weeks once the Northern Forensic Laboratory assumes responsibility.

  • Candidates’ positions are as thin as the economy

    A water expert I know complained last week that the candidates for governor haven’t said a word about water, one of the state’s biggest issues. But you can name about any subject and come to the same conclusion.

    Instead, the candidates have chosen to wrangle over perverts and who’s running the dirtier campaign. It’s surprising that Diane Denish would start with crime, which is Martinez’s strength, instead of her own, which is business and the economy.

  • Where’s the money coming from?

    SANTA FE — The good news for Republican gubernatorial candidate Susana Martinez is that she out-raised her Democratic opponent, Diane Denish, $611,000 to $188,000 last month.

    The bad news is that Denish has $2.2 million in the bank and Martinez has $300,000. A big chunk of that was a $250,000 contribution from the National Republican Governors Association. In May, Martinez got $450,000 from Texas developer Robert Perry. Before that, much of her money was coming from oil interests.

  • Running: Clifford tops field at pace race

    Most predicted finish times were well off the mark Tuesday, but not James Clifford’s.

    Clifford was the winner at the Atomic City Roadrunners’ pace race, which was held near Guaje Pines Cemetery. In all, 26 runners and walkers took part in Tuesday’s race.

    Clifford, who ran the 3-mile course, missed his predicted finish time by just 7 seconds.

    No one else on the long course was less than 71 seconds off. Tom Sandford missed by 71 seconds and Ted Williams was 76 seconds off.

  • Discover the magic in science

    The Harry Potter books are a gateway not only to magical worlds, but to aspects of the true history of early science and medicine. From botany (herbology) to chemistry (alchemy) to runes and codes (divination), J.K. Rowling based many details in her work on Renaissance scientific and philosophical endeavors. This summer, come explore “Harry Potter’s World”  through a traveling exhibit at Mesa Public Library Art Gallery from the National Libraries of Medicine and the American Library Association. Elizabeth Bland is the curator.

  • Running: McNiff, Wood repeat as Firecracker champs

    While the final result sheet said that Peter McNiff ran away with the title at the 2010 Firecracker 5K, it was actually Ryan McNiff whos earned the title.

    McNiff inadvertently grabbed his dad’s bib number at the start of the race, jumbling up the final standings. Nevertheless, McNiff and Heather Wood both successfully defended their 2009 titles at this year’s run.

    The Firecracker 5K, which is sponsored by the Family YMCA of Los Alamos, was run on July 4. In all, 242 participants entered in this year’s race, a record turnout.

  • Spy swap complete: Russia 10 - United States 4

    VIENNA (AP) — The U.S. and Russia orchestrated the largest spy swap since the Cold War, exchanging 10 spies arrested in the U.S. for four convicted in Russia in a tightly choreographed diplomatic dance Friday at Vienna's airport.

    Two planes — one from New York's La Guardia airport and another from Moscow — arrived in Vienna within minutes of each other, parked nose-to-tail at a remote section on the tarmac, then spent about an hour and a half before departing just as quickly. A small bus was seen driving between the two planes.