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Today's News

  • ’Topper earns opportunity to attend AJAS conference

    The American Junior Academy of Science (AJAS) choose Los Alamos high school student Ryan Erickson to attend the AJAS meeting in San Diego.The AJAS is America’s only honor research society for high school scientists.

    Each year, AJAS hosts a conference, held in conjunction with the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), to honor these students and induct them as fellows into AJAS.

    Erickson won this honor in a statewide scientific paper competition by writing and orally presenting the best paper.

  • Give youth a voice

    This week as we look at the asset that defines using youth as resources. The local data shows that 31 percent of youth in our community feel so inclined.

    Assets In Action is working in conjunction with the Juvenile Justice Advisory Board and other community groups to provide youth a voice for input to their meetings.

    If you have a youth willing to fill such a role, give me a call or drop me an e-mail. It will be my goal to get input from a variety of students. If you have a youth who is willing to e-mail me, text me, or fill out a form, that would be great.

  • 02-16-10 Update

    Police Beat

      Furniture thrown into a pool, possession of drugs and a DWI that resulted in a car crashing into a light pole tops this week’s Police Beat. Read more on page 2.

    Pancake supper tonight

  • Senate OKs limits on double-dipping retirees

    SANTA FE — Public employees could no longer double dip by returning to work in government jobs with a salary and their pension under legislation approved by the Senate on Monday.

    The proposed restrictions target state and local government employees retiring after July 1.

    The legislation will not stop about 1,500 state and municipal workers who already are receiving a salary and their pension. However, they will be forced to resume making payroll contributions into the public employee pension fund.

  • Hundreds attend field hearing

    LAS CRUCES — Opinions were split among about 600 people who showed up for a three-hour congressional field hearing to discuss proposed federal wilderness areas for southern New Mexico.

    Las Cruces resident Robert Macklin, a retired Army officer and avid hiker, attended to express his opposition.

    “I don’t want to see development in the Organ Mountains,” he said.

  • House OKs overhaul

    SANTA FE — A proposal to revamp the State Investment Council and reduce the governor’s influence over the board that oversees $12 billion in endowment funds was unanimously approved by the House on Sunday.

    The governor serves as the Investment Council’s chairman and can control the nine-member board through his appointment power. The bill would expand the council’s membership to 11 but reduce the governor’s public appointments from three to two members.

  • LANL model checks arctic warming

    A Los Alamos National Laboratory researcher is challenging theories about one of the most worrisome possibilities arising from global warming in the arctic.

    For the last few years, climate researchers have debated the potential risks of a massive release of huge methane reservoirs currently trapped at the bottom of the arctic seas.

  • Changes coming to East Park

    A miniature golf course and a high school-sized basketball court are two new features under construction at East Park. This new recreational area will replace the old tennis courts and is scheduled for a summer unveiling.

    Los Alamos County Parks Manager Richard McIntyre is heading up the project.

  • Roundabouts are the way to go

    Revitalized White Rock!  That’s the goal of all of us who have watched our town lose its charming village atmosphere where we could satisfy most of our needs locally.  

  • A bill to back and a bill to boo

    Late Friday night, Think New Mexico’s legislation to prohibit political contributions from lobbyists and government contractors (House Bill 118) was approved by the House Judiciary Committee, after having passed the House Voters and Elections Committee the previous week. With public support, the bill will continue through the legislative process.