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Today's News

  • Ethics bills reveal paranoia

    We made progress on ethics reform this year, in a roundabout way.

    An ethics commission is probably the single most important step. After years of weak excuses by legislative leadership of both parties, of ethics bills bottled up in committee, we finally got to the root of their reluctance: They feel a big target painted on their backs and the higher they are in the pecking order, the bigger the target.

  • County sets moving days

    Staff from the Community Development Department will begin moving out of the County Annex beginning March 22. Services will still be available from CDD (second floor of the County Annex) but may be limited as furniture and boxes are moved to their new temporary location at 195 East Road (in the TRK building, next to L.A. Fire Administration). They plan to be back up and operational on March 29.

  • Charter review subcommittee meets

    The Issues Analysis Subcommittee of the Charter Review Committee will meet at 4 p.m. Thursday, in Council Chambers to begin work on identifying solutions to their selected issue, “The perceived need for voters to have more control over major county projects.”  The members of this subcommittee are Chris Chandler, Harry Ettinger, Deborah Gill and Morrie Pongratz.

  • Smart grid effort

    POJOAQUE — The Japanese government has launched a four-year, $30-million research program in New Mexico to demonstrate green grid technology. A large share of the work will be done in Los Alamos, involving both county utilities and Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    Japan’s New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Corporation (NEDO) held a signing ceremony Friday with 70 representatives from 31 Japanese companies, along with state and local officials and representatives of LANL and Sandia National Laboratories and private companies in New Mexico.

  • UPDATE: Topper boys basketball wins big over Panthers

    The Los Alamos Hilltopper boys basketball team trounced the Piedra Vista Panthers Saturday afternoon in the first round of the Class AAAA playoffs.

    Los Alamos, the sixth seed in the AAAA tournament, led the entire way Saturday, racking up an 89-56 victory over the 11th-seeded Panthers. Los Alamos will now advance to play in the playoff semifinals 8 a.m. Wednesday in the Pit.

    For more information on this week's sports action, read Sunday's Monitor.

  • The return of the Renaissance

    On March 7, the Los Alamos Concert Association welcomes one of the most-respected early-music groups to Los Alamos.  Ensemble Caprice will perform a concert of Renaissance and Baroque period music at 4 p.m. in Duane Smith Auditorium. The concert will be followed by dinner with the artists at the Central Avenue Grill.

  • Changing lives through an auction

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  • Unemployment rate unchanged as employers shed 36K more jobs

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The unemployment rate held at 9.7 percent in February as employers shed 36,000 jobs, fewer than expected. The figures suggested the job market is slowly healing but that significant hiring has yet to occur.

    The Labor Department said it wouldn't quantify how the snowstorms that hammered the East Coast last month affected job losses. Some data in the report signaled the storms didn't reduce payrolls as much as had been feared.

  • Church auction helps change lives

    Local painter Betty Nance Smith will dabble in the construction business this weekend.

    Smith goes above and beyond the call of duty by donating remarkable paintings to the youth of the United Church of Los Alamos to raise funds for home building in Mexico.

    The annual auction to benefit the Mexico Mission project will feature almost 200 items in a silent auction. Residents can wander through rows of tables to bid on everything from new and used, to handy and oddly fascinating. There will be a live auction as well.

  • Boys track and field: LA hoping to build back into contention

    Larry Baca doesn’t often look past what he or his team is doing right now.

    Baca, the longtime head coach of the Los Alamos Hilltopper boys track and field team, likes to take things one day at a time. This season in particular.

    Los Alamos’ Hilltoppers, who have had some of their most successful seasons in recent history, will have to work hard to achieve that kind of success again this season. Los Alamos lost numerous key athletes to graduation over the last two years and it’s time for a little rebuilding.