Today's News

  • ‘The Glass Castle’ leaves you wanting more

    “The Glass Castle: A Memoir,” by Jeanette Walls, was published in 2005 and was on the Best Seller list for 100 weeks. With that kind of publicity, one would think this would be a marvelous book. The story details the life of Jeanette Walls, as she grew up in her (more than) dysfunctional family.  
    Moving from Arizona to California to Virginia in a matter of a few years, with periods of homelessness, the family was dirt poor. Walls reflects on all the emotional damage done by her mother and father, and the book becomes extremely emotional extremely fast.

  • Comparing American and European teens

    Summer is the perfect time to relax, let loose and explore. All around the globe, adolescents spend the entire school year planning and dreaming about their summer vacations.
    Naturally, with each geographical region comes a different plan and a different dream, mostly because of the opportunities given within each area.
    While I cannot speak for every continent on the planet, I have had my fair share of summers in both the United States and Europe and they are both very different experiences.
    While summer in the United States generally implies summer camp or sightseeing with parents, a European summer gives teens much more responsibility and freedom.

  • Animal Shelter 08-21-11

    The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of on-site adoptable pets; others are in foster care with loving, temporary homes.
    Pardon our construction. We are installing solar hot water, so the shelter has been closed to prevent accidents. If you need some help, call a volunteers at 412-3451.
    It’s summer, remember that pets also suffer when the temperature rises. Cooling animals (dogs, rabbits, cats) by giving them a “cool” bath or shower to help keep their body temperature down.
    A cool towel on a tile floor to lay on, a cool towel or washcloth laying over the skin, next to a fan will also help cool the animal.
    Make sure they have plenty of cool water to drink as well.

  • News for Retirees 08-21-11

    Aug. 21-27, 2011
    For information, call the Betty Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 662-8200 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations must be made by 10 a.m. for daily lunches.

    Betty Ehart

    8:45 a.m.    Cardio plus exercise
    10:30 a.m.    Advisory council
    11:30 a.m.    Lunch: Sweet ‘n sour pork
    1:30 p.m.    Pilates canceled
    7 p.m.    Ballroom dancing

    8:45 a.m.    Variety training
    10 a.m.    Low vision-hearing support group

  • Youth Activity Center schedule 08-21-11

    Youth Activity Center schedule
    Monday — Stripes pool
    Tuesday — Dodgeball
    Wednesday —   Movies and  munchies
    Thursday — Beads and wires
    Friday —   Endurance  games
    All children   promoted to third through eighth grade are welcome to join free of  charge.
    The  centers are  located at 475 20th Street (by Ashley Pond)  and  10 Sherwood Blvd., Piñon Park.
    Call 662-9412 or 672-1565 for information.

  • Russian youth visit Los Alamos

    At long last, 10 Russian High School students from Sarov, Russia, Los Alamos’ sister city, are in town. This much anticipated, two-week visit was originally scheduled for late June, early July, but had to be postponed at the last minute because of the Las Conchas Fire. But now they’re here.
    The students, accompanied by two chaperones, are learning about life in the city and are touring other parts of Northern New Mexico, including Santa Fe, Taos and Bandelier National Monument. All the visitors are staying with local host families, some of which include Los Alamos youth who visited Sarov last summer.

  • LAHS NJROTC raises money for Red Cross

    Thank you Los Alamos!
    Members of the Los Alamos NJROTC stand with a final figure of donations collected at their benefit car wash in July. The total proceeds of $885.20 from this activity were forwarded to the New Mexico chapter of the American Red Cross. Lt. Cmdr. Wesley Shumaker, the group’s commander, said the unit is grateful for the generosity of the community in this effort.

  • Los Alamos composer honors firefighters

    During the last week in June, when the Las Conchas Fire threatened Los Alamos, T. Edward Vives, director of the Los Alamos Community Winds, was inspired to compose, “New Mexico Firefighters March ­— Whatever it Takes.”
    The music is dedicated to Chief Doug Tucker and the Los Alamos Fire Department. The premier performance of the piece by the LACW will be at an appreciation event for firefighters involved in the Las Conchas fire. The event will be from 4-6 p.m. Aug. 25 at Ashley Pond.

  • Southwestern jewelry focus of talk

    When Shelby Tisdale became director of the Millicent Rogers Museum in 2002, she learned that it had a grant from the Henry Luce Foundation, Inc., for an exhibition and book on its jewelry collection. Two directors had come and gone since the grant was awarded, so Tisdale decided it was time to tackle the project.
    It was a monumental undertaking. Millicent Rogers collected 1,281 pieces of jewelry — nearly 30 percent of her entire collection. In her book “Fine Indian Jewelry of the Southwest: The Millicent Rogers Museum Collection,” Tisdale writes, “Almost as if she was collecting for a museum, Millicent Rogers selected examples of Native American and Hispano arts and crafts of exceptional significance, quality and diversity.”

  • Some colorful governors

    Who were New Mexico’s most off-beat governors?  My choices are Dave Cargo, Gary Johnson and Clyde Tingley.
    It isn’t difficult for most New Mexicans to remember Gary Johnson. He was governor back just the other side of Bill Richardson.  It often seemed as though Johnson was more interested in his athletic feats than in being governor.
    But Johnson did attend to business, keeping New Mexico’s budget under firm control while pushing his libertarian views of restraining government from interfering in people’s business or private lives.