Today's News

  • UNM-LA program receives grant

    The University of New Mexico-Los Alamos recently received an $874,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to improve and market the UNM-LA Applied Technologies program.
    This associate degree in applied science is designed to train students for future careers as technicians in the areas of solar, electromechanical and nano technology.
    “There is a growing need on the part of Los Alamos National Laboratory and other high tech businesses and agencies for technicians with skills in these areas,” said Applied Technologies Program Coordinator Dr. Irina Alvestad.

  • Fix the knowledge gap

    Neutral is the outlook for the New Mexico economy from the Economics Group at Wells Fargo Securities.
    Wells’ only “upside risk” appears to be “if alternative energy begins to take hold over the near term.”
    Near term? What? A year or two? Snicker, chortle. Wells’ economists must be mainlining the green air around their San Francisco offices.
    One has to wonder if the neutral declaration, issued June 24, offers some insight about New Mexico getting no mention in Wells’ much broader report, dated April 13, “Economic Dynamics and State Competitiveness.”
    Maybe, being neutral, there are no dynamics to mention and no competitiveness to analyze.

  • Entrepreneurs: Beware of the valley of death

    Business owners know it takes money to make money; production expenses must be paid before products are sold and revenue is received.
    Entrepreneurs with a business idea have an even greater need for up-front cash.
    They must have enough capital to cover negative cash flow in the early months or years of new business creation and growth.
    Without adequate initial investment, they risk falling into the so-called valley of death – the deep and wide gulf that separates a company’s need for capital and investors’ willingness to supply it.
    Also known as the grand canyon of capital need vs. availability, the valley can be shallow or deep depending on the amount of money needed to develop the idea or product.

  • Triathlon returns Saturday

    The 2011 Los Alamos Triathlon is closing its online registration Thursday night.
    The triathlon, one of the most popular local sporting events of the year, is scheduled for Saturday morning. The first wave of contestants will head out at 7 a.m.
    Online registrations are being accepted at active.com through 7 p.m. Thursday. Price for online registration is $50 for individuals, $90 for relay teams of two and $120 for three-person relay teams.
    The triathlon is open to a total of 350 competitors.
    The triathlon consists of a 20-kilometer bike race, followed by a 400-meter swim in the aquatic center’s pool, followed by a 5-kilometer run up and down Canyon Road.

  • Hurricanes facing big allegations

    CORAL GABLES, Fla. (AP) — The Miami Hurricanes’ entire football team took the practice field Wednesday amid mounting allegations by a former booster and convicted Ponzi schemer who claimed he treated players with sex parties, nightclub outings, cars and other gifts.
    Nevin Shapiro told Yahoo! Sports he provided extra benefits to 72 football players and other athletes at Miami from 2002 to 2010. His claims involve several current players, but coach Al Golden said it was too soon to take disciplinary action.
    The Hurricanes open their season Sept. 5 against Maryland.

  • Senior men's tourney results

    Here are the results from the Northern New Mexico Senior Men’s Golf Association tournaments at Santa Fe Country Club and Paa-Ko Ridge last week.

    Santa Fe Country Club, Aug. 9

    Championship flight

    First low gross
    Rob Schneider, Santa Fe, 74.

    Second low gross
    Larry Minarsich, Bernalillo, 80.

    First low net
    Henry Hodde, Santa Fe, 71.

    First flight

    First low gross
    Dale Crumpton, Pagosa Springs, 78.

    Second low gross
    Bob Quick, Los Alamos, 78.

    First low net
    Dan Shannon, Santa Fe, 66.

    Second flight

    First low gross

  • Board of Directors votes to let Tripp rescind his resignation

    Not so fast.
    Gary Tripp, the executive director of the New Mexico Activities Association, may have changed his mind about retiring after this academic year.
    Tripp, who has led the NMAA since 2004, announced that he asked the NMAA board of directors to rescind his decision to retire.
    The NMAA is the governing body of most major sports and interscholastic activities in the state.
    In June, NMAA officials announced that Tripp had turned in his letter of resignation to the board effective June 2012, immediately after the end of the current academic year. However, Tripp had a bit of a change of heart recently.

  • Obama to lay out new jobs plan in Sept. speech

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Seeking to jolt the economy, President Barack Obama will propose new ideas to create jobs and help the struggling poor and middle class in a major speech after Labor Day. And then he will try to seize political advantage by spending the fall pressuring Congress to act on his plan.

  • Tornado-stricken Joplin goes back to school--video extra

    JOPLIN, MO. (AP) — The trophy case by the front entrance is nearly empty. Classroom walls are largely bare, and unopened boxes of textbooks, computer monitors and other equipment remain scattered throughout the building.

    Signs of unfinished business remain at what is now Joplin High's upper-level campus — a converted big-box retail store at the city's mall, well outside the worst-hit areas from a late May tornado that killed 160 people, injured hundreds more and destroyed thousands of buildings, including the city's only public high school.

  • Core wholesale inflation up most in 6 months

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Companies paid higher prices for tobacco, pickup trucks and pharmaceuticals in July, driving underlying wholesale inflation up by the most in six months.

    This measure of inflation, which excludes volatile food and energy prices, is known as the core Producer Price Index. It rose 0.4 percent in July, the biggest increase since January.

    The overall PPI, which measures price changes in goods before they reach the consumer, rose 0.2 percent last month, the Labor Department said Wednesday. That follows a 0.4 percent drop in June, the first decline in 17 months.

    Gas prices fell for the second straight month. Food costs rose 0.6 percent, the biggest rise since February.