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Today's News

  • Chorus to sing member’s work

    Sometimes what makes music special goes beyond how it sounds. For Coro de Cámara, the upcoming concert features a piece that holds a particular sentiment to the group.

    The concert, “Let the River Run,” which will be at 7 p.m. Saturday in the Kelly Hall at Trinity on the Hill Episcopal Church, will include a work created by one of the chorus members, Joe Cox.

    The piece is titled, “I want Jesus to Walk with Me.” It will be included in the second half of the program with other spirituals. The first half is dedicated to folk songs.

  • Bank phone scam circulates town

    Residents of Los Alamos and surrounding areas are receiving automated calls to their cell phones claiming to be from their financial institution. These automated phone calls are a scam.

    The automated call indicates that your account has been suspended or compromised and then asks for the customer’s ATM or debit card number and PIN.

    The phone calls are NOT from a financial institution.

    You should never provide personal information or account numbers over the phone unless you originate the call and know to whom you are speaking.

  • Non-highway signs to be removed

    SANTA FE — New Mexico Department of Transportation District Five maintenance crews will continuously remove non-highway signage from New Mexico Department of Transportation Right-of-Way areas within the NMDOT District Five boundaries. NMDOT District Five boundaries are located within Torrance, Santa Fe, Los Alamos, Rio Arriba, Taos and San Juan Counties.

  • Interns facing housing shortage

    Many of the thousand or more students who flood Los Alamos every summer to intern at Los Alamos National Laboratory encounter a lack of student housing.

    UNM-Los Alamos has 64 efficiency apartments on 9th Street. Housing coordinator Betsey Suarzo said this morning all 64 units are already rented.

    Jeanne Bridge of Plateau Property Management, which owns and manages three apartment complexes and a mobile home park in Los Alamos describes a similar situation.

  • NM jobless numbers crept up again in March

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — New Mexico's jobless rate hit 8.8 percent in March, rising from the 8.7 percent rate in February and the 6.3 percent rate of March 2009.

    State labor officials say New Mexico's unemployment rate is higher than it's been in more than 22 years, but falls below the national average.

    The national unemployment rate remained at 9.7 percent last month.

    New Mexico lost 17,000 jobs between March 2009 and March 2010.

  • Obama turns up the heat for health care overhaul

    "Now, despite all the progress and improvements we've made, Republicans in Congress insist that the only acceptable course on health care is to start over. But you know what? The insurance companies aren't starting over," Obama said in his weekly radio and Internet address Saturday.

    "I just met with some of them on Thursday, and they couldn't give me a straight answer as to why they keep arbitrarily and massively raising premiums — by as much as 60 percent in states like Illinois. If we do not act, they will continue to do this."

  • Toppers bow out again in quarterfinal round, 56-47

    ALBUQUERQUE – In many respects, the Los Alamos Hilltopper boys basketball

  • Toppers bow out again in quarterfinal round, 56-47

    ALBUQUERQUE – In many respects, the Los Alamos Hilltopper boys basketball

  • Thinking creatively with waste

    Once the juice from a bottle has been drunk or the final chip from the bag has been eaten, it seems like that plastic bottle or bag is no longer any good. Its use has been used up.

    Not so, according to TerraCycle, a company in New Jersey that turns non-recyclable waste into affordable, eco-friendly products.

    Furthermore, Chamisa Elementary School is among the 60,000 locations that supports TerraCycle’s claim.

  • NMED: LANL PCBs no threat to Rio Grande drinking water

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — The New Mexico Environment Department has concluded pollution in the Rio Grande coming from Los Alamos National Laboratory remains below standards for drinking water.

    The department says concentrations fell below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's standard for PCBs in drinking water and are not a threat to Albuquerque's drinking water supply.

    The results released this week come from a 2009 study on water quality in the river near Santa Fe's Buckman diversion project and during storm flows in Albuquerque.