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Today's News

  • Best Sellers 08-04-11

    The Los Alamos Monitor has the inside scoop on what locals are reading. Otowi Station issued a current list of  popular books for Los Alamos readers.

  • SFO's production of 'Wozzeck' is full of scandal

    The 2011 season at the Santa Fe Opera has certainly provided a variety of entertainment. Beginning with a classic like “La Boheme” and moving to the comedy of “The Last Savage,” we end the season in tragic scandal with “Wozzek.”
    Directed by Daniel Slater and conducted by David Robertson, “Wozzek” (Richard Paul Fink) is the story of a poor army private that earns extra pennies by shaving his captain (Robert Brubaker) and subjecting himself to a doctor’s (Eric Owens) medical experimentation.

  • Roswell: It's out of this world


    If Texas is like a whole other country, then Roswell, N.M. is like a whole other universe. From fast-food restaurant signs welcoming aliens to the UFO Alien Museum downtown, Roswell embraces and even revels in its history.

  • Following the sewage

    Out of sight, out of mind. (At my age, alas, I no longer live within the confines of that dictum. I can forget, misplace and overlook things that are smack in front of my face. But I digress.)
    What many folks can’t see they can indeed overlook. And all too many Americans have never seen what happens to the water that flows down the kitchen sink and out of the house.
    But with each load of laundry or flush of the toilet, we create wastewater that’s mingled together and heads toward treatment plants.
    The average American makes 100 gallons of wastewater per day.
    While it’s natural to think that sewage water is icky, it’s also a fact that sewage is natural – and it’s even interesting from a biological point of view.

  • Secrecy obsession is no longer part of the equation

    Should the Manhattan Project that produced the world’s first atomic bomb be made part of the U.S. national park system?
    The answer in most of the country is disbelief that our proud nation has taken over 60 years to get anywhere close to recognizing its role in the birth of the Atomic Age.
    But the answer in much of Santa Fe and its surroundings is how dare they honor an instrument of mass murder and universal destruction.
    Opposition of the moralistic handwringers has not been much of an impediment to establishing a historical park, however.

  • Postponed 5K race is a go for Saturday

    William Hill has been hopping for the last couple of days to put the finishing touches on the Firecracker 5K event.
    Hill, the sports director at the Family YMCA of Los Alamos, is the primary organizer of the race, which will be Saturday starting at the YMCA’s facility on 15th Street.
    The 5K race, which has in recent years turned into one of the more popular local races, was originally scheduled to take place on Independence Day. The race was postponed, however, due to the effects of the Las Conchas Fire in late June and the ensuing evacuation of the town.
    Things are finally settling down to the point where events such as these can be rescheduled and Hill said he’s expecting the event to be a good one.

  • Unemployment aid applications tick down to 400K

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Weekly applications for unemployment benefits edged down 1,000 to a seasonally adjusted 400,000, the Labor Department said Thursday. That's the lowest level in four months. The previous week's figure was revised upward from 398,000 to 401,000.

    The four-week average, a less volatile figure, dropped for the fifth straight week to 407,750. That suggests there is a downward trend in layoffs.

    Applications "have been grinding lower, and this week's result is at least not bad news, which at this point feels pretty good," said Robert Kavcic, an economist at BMO Capital markets, in an email.

    Stock futures fluctuated after the report was released before erasing earlier losses.

  • Health law windfall for Massachusetts hospitals

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Hospitals in Massachusetts will reap an annual windfall of $275 million through a loophole enshrined in the new health care law. Hospitals in most other states will get less money as a result.

    The disclosure was buried in a regulation that Medicare issued late last week. Hospital association executives in other states are up in arms over the news, which comes at a time when they are girding for more cuts under the newly signed federal debt deal.

    "If I could think of a better word than outrageous, I would come up with it," said Steve Brenton, president of the Wisconsin Hospital Association.

  • More to FAA shutdown than air service subsidies

    WASHINGTON (AP) — On the surface, the partial shutdown of the Federal Aviation Administration is about whether to cut $16 million in air service subsidies, a pretty small amount in this town. Underneath are layers upon layers of political gamesmanship that, at its heart, is about whether Democrats or Republicans get to call the shots in Congress.

    The immediate price is high. Already, 4,000 FAA employees have been furloughed, more than 200 construction projects have been halted and an estimated 70,000 other private-sector workers affected. Air traffic controllers and safety inspectors have remained on the job because the agency still has money from another pool of funds to pay them.

  • Bandelier Opens to Visitation

    Jason Lott, Superintendent of Bandelier National Monument announced today, "Bandelier National Monument is open for business and visitors are rediscovering mesa-top areas of the park. The Monument has relaxed most fire restrictions and visitors may also enjoy campfires at Juniper Campground."

    The sight of visitors at the Tsankawi District and driving through the main entrance station is a promising sign to park staff and local businesses. In addition to the Tsankawi District, visitors may hike along the Tyuonyi Overlook Trail to view the Frijoles Canyon cultural sites, and along Burnt Mesa Trail to see the rapid greening-up of an area affected by the Las Conchas Fire.