Today's News

  • Dolores Hope, wife of Bob Hope, dies at 102

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — Dolores Hope, who was married to entertainer Bob Hope for 69 years and sang at his shows, has died at age 102.

    Hope family spokesman Harlan Boll says Hope died Monday at home in Los Angeles. A specific cause of death was not available.

    The death was first reported by Entertainment Tonight.

    Bob Hope died in 2003 at age 100.

    Dolores Reade was a nightclub singer before she married Bob Hope in 1934. She mostly stayed home with their children before Hope began his Christmas trips to entertain U.S. troops during World War II.

    She sang for U.S. troops and on his television specials.

  • 10th person dies from injuries in Reno air crash--video extra

    RENO, Nev. (AP) — A 10th person died overnight from injuries suffered Friday in the nation's deadliest air racing disaster, a crash that killed nine and sent about 70 people to Reno-area hospitals.

    Saint Mary's Regional Medical Center spokeswoman Jamii Uboldi said Monday morning the patient who died was male, but she couldn't immediately release his name, age and hometown.

    Amid the horrific aftermath of the crash, a sort of calm pervaded.

    Witnesses were spattered with blood and pieces of flesh, yet video of the scene shows paramedics, police and spectators attending to the wounded with a control that seems contradictory to the devastation.

  • US stocks open lower as Greek debt woes persist

    NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks sank Monday amid fresh concerns that a bailout package for Greece wouldn't take shape in time for the country to avoid defaulting on its debts. The plunge comes in the wake of Wall Street's best week in months.

    European finance ministers said Friday they would delay authorizing a new installment of emergency funds for Greece until October. Investors fear that the country will fail to convince its lenders that it can pay its debts.

    The Greek cabinet will meet to devise new austerity measures, but the country risks not qualifying for an $11 billion installment of the bailout package it received last year, as well as a second bailout worth $149 billion.

  • Emmycast with Jane Lynch presiding was a winner

    Even if your favorite nominee got snubbed, Sunday's Emmycast could have been the most satisfying in memory.

    It was funny, bright and skillfully hosted by "Glee" star Jane Lynch.

    It moved at a brisk clip, free of the usual stumbles and lulls, and, even better, it flowed almost seamlessly, a next-to-impossible feat for any awards show.

  • Labor Dept. expands enforcement of wage violations

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Labor Department is signing agreements to share information with nine states and the Internal Revenue Service as it gets more aggressive in its program to crack down on businesses that cheat workers out of their hard-earned wages.

    The information will help Labor officials target businesses that improperly label workers as independent contractors or as non-employees to deprive workers of minimum wage and overtime pay. Misclassifying workers also lets companies avoid paying workers compensation, unemployment insurance and federal taxes.

    Patricia Smith, the Labor Department's top lawyer, said sharing information between state and federal agencies could subject businesses to multiple fines.

  • Obama to propose $1.5 trillion in new tax revenue

    WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama will propose $1.5 trillion in new taxes as part of a plan to identify more than $3 trillion in long-term deficit reduction and slow the nation's escalating national debt.

    Obama's tax plan is aimed predominantly at the wealthy and draws sharp contrasts with congressional Republicans.

    It comes just days after House Speaker John Boehner ruled out tax increases to lower deficits. It also comes amid a clamor in his own Democratic Party for Obama to take a tougher stance against Republicans. And while the plan stands little chance of passing Congress, its populist pitch is one that the White House believes the public can support.

  • Incumbents paired in Senate redistricting proposal

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — Democrats are proposing to reshuffle the political landscape of the 42-member state Senate by drawing new districts that could force two incumbent Republicans to run against each other in next year's election.

    The Senate is expected to debate the redistricting plan on Wednesday. Republicans oppose the measure, contending it could strengthen Democratic control of the Senate.

    Democrats hold a 27-15 majority in the Senate.

    The proposal would merge two districts in southeastern New Mexico, putting Republicans Rod Adair, of Roswell, and William Burt, of Alamogordo, in the same district. The plan also pairs Democrat Dede Feldman and Republican John Ryan in one Albuquerque district.

  • Andrew and Mousie 09-18-11
  • Word on the Street 09-18-11

    Teen Pulse staff member Ben Hanlon, a homeschooled seventh grader, recently asked Los Alamos Middle School student Annika Davenport a few questions.

  • Tips to help you get ready for homecoming

    You’ve got to love the homecoming dance, but the question is: what do you wear? Ok, let’s start with the basics.
    First of all, homecoming is a semi-formal dance, so for guys, that means slacks and a button-up shirt. Suits are not usually worn at homecoming, but if you are dying to wear a suit, go for it!
    For girls, a dress and heels are a must. The number one tip to keep in mind when it comes to a homecoming dress, it that it must fit right and be the right color. The worst thing you could do is show up at the dance in a very colorful dress that does not suit your skin tone.