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Today's News

  • Trio wins chemistry Nobel for key chemical tool

    STOCKHOLM (AP) — An American and two Japanese scientists won the 2010 Nobel Prize in chemistry on Wednesday for developing chemical methods widely used to make potential cancer drugs and other medicines, as well as slimmed-down computer screens.

    Richard Heck, Ei-ichi Negishi and Akira Suzuki were honored for their development four decades ago of one of the most sophisticated tools available to chemists today, called palladium-catalyzed cross couplings.

  • It's go-for-broke time on 9th anniversary of war

    KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — The war in Afghanistan enters its 10th year Thursday with key players hedging their bets, uncertain whether the Obama administration is prepared to stay for the long haul, move quickly to exit an increasingly unpopular conflict, or something in between.

    Fearing that his Western allies may in the end abandon him, Afghan President Hamid Karzai has started to prepare his nation for a withdrawal of international forces by shoring up relations with neighboring Pakistan and reaching out to insurgents interested in reconciliation.

  • Candidates contrast on issues in NM race for governor

    Diane Denish and Susana Martinez are locked in battle to become New Mexico's first woman governor. The issues loom large with a ballooning budget gap, taxes and a sputtering economy. Their approach to governance, for the most part, runs in lockstep with ideological differences in the political parties they each represent.

    The following is a snapshot look at the two candidates on key issues in the race for New Mexico governor:

    DEMOCRAT DIANE DENISH

  • Football: Roethlisberger looks sharp in 1st practice

    PITTSBURGH (AP) — Ten seconds were all Ben Roethlisberger needed to prove to the Pittsburgh Steelers he wasn't affected by his month away from the NFL.

    On the first pass he threw Tuesday in his first post-suspension practice, Roethlisberger found fast wide receiver Mike Wallace far downfield for an over-the-shoulder catch of a perfectly thrown football.

    Right about then, his teammates probably were thinking the same thing: Ben is back.

  • Conn. jury convicts man in deadly home invasion

    NEW HAVEN, Conn. (AP) — A paroled burglar was convicted Tuesday of murdering a woman and her two daughters in their suburban home during a night of terror that drew comparisons to "In Cold Blood" and bolstered efforts to retain the death penalty in Connecticut.

    The mother was sexually assaulted and strangled. Her two girls died of smoke inhalation after the youngest was sexually assaulted, they were tied to their beds and doused in gasoline, and the house was set on fire.

  • Bank bailout supporters struggling for re-election

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The government's giant bank bailout may well have averted a second Great Depression, economists say, but a lot of voters aren't buying it. Support for the program is turning into a kiss of death for many in Congress.

  • Be There 10-05-10

    Wednesdsay
    Want to know more about angels? Angels in the Judeo, Christian and Muslim traditions will be discussed at 6 p.m. Oct. 6, 13 and 20 at the First United Methodist Church Friendship Center. Facts will be separated from myths and religious authorities will be referred to for their guidance. David Israelivitz from the Los Alamos Jewish Center will address Jewish angels. Ann Le Page will talk about Christian angels and M’hamed Jebbanema will discuss Muslim angels.

  • Smash and grab suspects booked

    Los Alamos police apprehended two suspects at Anderson Overlook Friday afternoon. The men are under investigation for a series of smash and grab thefts plaguing local car owners for some time. The two 18-year-olds drove up from Santa Fe with another man and reportedly smashed the windows on several car windows and grabbed items within reach including radar detectors and GPS devices.

  • To convert or not to convert

    There has been a lot of discussion this year on whether or not someone who currently has a traditional IRA should convert it into a Roth IRA.  
    In this column we will take a look at how Roth IRAs work, and if it makes sense to convert your IRA into a Roth.
    First, let’s take a look at a brief history of Roth IRAs. Roth IRAs were established in 1997 as part of the Taxpayer Relief Act to offer another way for Americans to save for retirement.
    Although contribution limits are the same with Traditional and Roth IRAs, there are some major differences.

  • Local microgrid starts on $27 million

    Projects in the mountain town of Los Alamos shape strong tools for tomorrow. New evidence is the $27 million in contracts among Los Alamos County, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the state of New Mexico and an alliance of 19 Japanese companies.