.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • League forum illuminates the law

    For the second time in as many weeks, sitting judges and attorneys running for First Judicial District seats pleaded their cases before local audiences.

    The Los Alamos League of Women Voters forum Tuesday evening drew all nine candidates and nearly filled the lecture hall at UNM-Los Alamos with community members.

    LWV President Barbara Calef and Vice President Becky Shankland officiated the forum, drawing their line of questioning from both league and audience members.

  • Music brings out another side to Tinsley Ellis

    Musician Tinsley Ellis is a quiet-spoken man. His low-key demeanor during an interview with Monitor seems highly contrasted to reviews of his performances.

    Relix described his music as “blistering, inspired roadhouse blues and passionate Southern rock … gritty, soulful vocals.”

    Billboard goes on to say, “Altlanta’s Tinsley Ellis sings like a man possessed and wields a ferocious lead guitar … one of today’s premier blues/rock players.”

  • Legendary runner to participate in race

    Among the thousands of runners who will participate in this year’s Jemez Mountain Trail Runs, an utlrarunning legend will also hit the trail.

    Ultrarunning legend Micah True (aka Caballo Blanco) will not only participate in the trail runs but he will share his story about living and running with the Tarahumara Indians of Central Mexico.

  • Golf: NNMSMGA’s results from Las Campanas

    Los Alamos golfer Spike Jones turned in one of the low rounds of Tuesday’s Northern New Mexico Senior Men’s Golf Association’s first flight.

    Jones finished the day with an 87, placing him tied in the gross category with Darryl Fry of Santa Fe at Tuesday’s tournament, held at Las Campanas in Santa Fe.

    NNMSMGA is a golf organization for men aged 50 and over in northern New Mexico — Albuquerque and points north — and southern Colorado.

  • Establish new standards for storing nuclear waste

    WASHINGTON, DC — Alongside rivers and lakes, on ocean shores and tidal bays, nearly 63,000 metric tons of high-level radioactive waste — which remains dangerous for longer than recorded history — sits in “temporary” storage. In some cases, it’s been there for decades. And it’s almost certain to remain for decades longer, scattered around 33 states.

  • Outdoor education: Why it matters

    In this time of financial downturn, our educational system threatens to become stripped of anything but the very basics — reading, writing and arithmetic. The perception is that everything must be taught right at the desk.   But I’d like to challenge that idea.  

  • 05-20-10 Update

    Storage space needed

      The LA Cares Food Bank has an immediate need for a storage area for canned food that has been donated for distribution to needy families. Storage area should be 400–600 square feet, heated and easily accessible to vehicle loading/unloading. The space is needed by May 30. Anyone with suitable space, contact Jeanne Butler at 662-6670 or 412-3631.

    Free workshops

  • LATA wins contract awards

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded a small-business contract to LATA Environmental Services of Kentucky, LLC April 22, worth approximately $285 million to continue the environmental remediation project at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Paducah, Kentucky. Following a 90-day transition period, LATA will assume responsibility for the remediation contract on or about July 21.  

  • For whom much is given

    Longtime resident Bernadette Lauritzen is one of those inspirational people motivated essentially by a desire to make things better for the rest of us.

    Many local organizations and countless individuals have been touched by her kindness, which Laurtizen explains is inspired by the bible verse in Luke 12:48, “For of those to whom much is given, much is required.”

    “I think my family has been pretty fortunate and so I think we should give back,” she said.

  • Giving street cred to art

    Art is not limited to impressionism or baroque styles. There’s a whole other style of art that thrives in urban areas. It decorates city buildings, adorns people’s arms and ankles and pops up on TV. Perhaps street art is easy to dismiss because it strays from the mainstream but it does have real credibility. Just look at artist Jesse Hernandez’s work. According to Hernandez’s Web site, the artist is influenced by a combination of styles.  His work draws from traditional indigenous styles and themes with an urban sensibility.