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Today's News

  • Aquatomics’ results from the Nick Nogar Invitational

    The Los Alamos Aquatomics swim team picked up six age division high-point awards at the Nick Nogar Memorial Invitational.
    The youth swim meet was last month at the Larry R. Walkup Aquatic Center. Nearly 200 swimmers from 11 club teams took part.
    In all, the Aquatomics, who hosted the meet, had nine swimmers finish in the top three places in total points in their age divisions. Aquatomics’ swimmers Ian Jaegers (boys 9-10), Alana Goodwin (girls 11-12), Dylan Ma (boys 11-12), Kaitlin Bennett (girls 13-14), Alexander Jaegers (boys 13-14) and Ashlynn Bennett (girls 15 and over) were the high-point leaders at the meet.

  • Larry the Lobster off the menu

    WATERFORD, Conn. (AP) — A Connecticut man purchased a 17-pound lobster at a Waterford restaurant, then released the crustacean back into Long Island Sound.

    Don MacKenzie of Niantic tells The Day of New London he knew the lobster, nicknamed "Lucky Larry" by local children, would have to be about 80-years-old to reach his current size and felt it deserved to live.

    MacKenzie won't say how much he paid The Dock restaurant to take Larry off the menu.

    He took the lobster back to sea Tuesday, releasing it in a secret location.

  • Today in History for July 25th
  • Sherman Hemsley of TV's "The Jeffersons" dies

    EL PASO, Texas (AP) — Sherman Hemsley, the actor who made the irascible, bigoted George Jefferson of "The Jeffersons" one of television's most memorable characters and a symbol for urban upward mobility, has died. He was 74.

    Police in El Paso, Texas, said late Tuesday that Hemsley was found dead at his home on the eastside of the city. A statement from police said no foul play is suspected and that the exact cause of death is pending.

  • Alleged shooter was surrounded by brain experts

    CENTENNIAL, Colo. (AP) — James Holmes spent a year in a small neuroscience doctoral program, surrounded by scientists and roughly three dozen classmates delving into the inner workings of the brain.

    The University of Colorado, Denver, isn't saying if they had any warning signs.

    Experts say, however, the intimacy of the program and its focus on the brain may not have been enough for staff and students to detect that Holmes was on a course that police say ended with a deadly rampage at a midnight showing of the new Batman movie.

  • CDC: More Teens Using Condoms
  • Hovering Storm Clouds

    Storm clouds gather over the Jemez Mountains and Los Alamos around noon today.

  • Community water events take center stage later this week

    The theme for the community water events planned by the Communities for Clean Water is “Weaving Our Río Grande Communities Together.”  
    Three public education programs will be in Santa Fe and Española on Thursday and in Española on Friday.  The programs are free and open to the public.  
    On Thursday, 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., a Community Water Forum will be conducted at the Santa Fe Community Convention Center, located at 201 Marcy Street.  Its main topic will be the Buckman Projects and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).  

  • Map to outline forest roads open under new plan

    SANTA FE (AP) — A map expected to be released this fall will let visitors to Santa Fe National Forest know where they cannot travel.
    All national forests are required to create the so-called travel management plans to control the impact of motorized vehicles on natural resources.
    The northern New Mexico forest released its plan earlier this year, banning motorized travel on more than half of the roads, trails and routes on its 1.6 million acres.
    Hunters, anglers, campers and off-road enthusiasts will need to consult a map to find out whether they still can travel on their favorite roads and trails, the Santa Fe New Mexican reported.

  • Map to outline forest roads open under new plan

    SANTA FE (AP) — A map expected to be released this fall will let visitors to Santa Fe National Forest know where they cannot travel.
    All national forests are required to create the so-called travel management plans to control the impact of motorized vehicles on natural resources.
    The northern New Mexico forest released its plan earlier this year, banning motorized travel on more than half of the roads, trails and routes on its 1.6 million acres.
    Hunters, anglers, campers and off-road enthusiasts will need to consult a map to find out whether they still can travel on their favorite roads and trails, the Santa Fe New Mexican reported.