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Today's News

  • Just what we learned when Tiger returned

    Tiger Woods returned to golf this past weekend.

    As I write this I have no idea how he finished in the Masters, one of the game’s four major championships.  He had a good first day, a decent second day and made the cut. Damn.

    Look, at the risk of being called every vile name in the book – including racist – let me say up front that I’d hoped he would tank.  

  • It’s that dreaded time of year

    SANTA FE — The most dreaded time of year is here again. Income taxes are due tomorrow. Millions of Americans have pulled out the shoebox and are sorting through receipts and bills. If you haven’t started yet, you may be too late.

    On average, Americans filling out the long form spend 21.4 hours wading through the 172 pages of explanations for the federal form. Some 86 million more already have taken their records to a professional.

  • King lends $60,000 to re-election campaign

    SANTA FE — Democratic Attorney General Gary King has boosted his re-election fundraising with personal loans of $60,000, according to a new campaign finance disclosure.

    King’s campaign raised $166,271, including the loans, and spent $73,049 from October through April 5.

    The Republican candidate for attorney general, Matthew Chandler of Clovis, collected $67,883 for his campaign and spent $8,712.

    King had $93,222 of cash in his campaign account and Chandler reported a balance of $62,720 as of last week.

  • Rough Riders strike out administration

    The Luna Community College Rough Riders baseball team routed their bosses and administration last week, without putting on the cleats.

    In fact, the Rough Rider players hit a grand slam last week without picking up a bat. What they did was join together and put their names on the line to stop the years-long shameful drinking on the job by their coach, Peter Ortiz.

  • Listening for a change

    When I walk on Sundays with my faithful mutt along the bottom of the Snake River Canyon, I usually hear only the wind in my ears.    

    It’s surprising how loud a breeze can be in a human ear, and try as I might I’ve not found anything about breeze-sounds to be particularly interesting. Still, just to keep me awake, perhaps, Mother Nature punctuates the breeze sometimes with a snake’s rattle in the warmth of summer — and, of course, I do listen carefully for them.

  • The world's worst job

    I’m a hugger. Always have been, always will be. My parents brought me up to be one; I married one and my doctor is one. Problem is, when my doctor has bad news for me, instead of walking into the room with a smile and giving me a big hug, as she usually does, she walks in frowning and sits straight down in the chair. It’s an instant give away. And the problem is, if she’s going to tell me bad news, then that’s when I need a big hug the most!

  • The value of diversity

    “The challenges and opportunities that confront Mississippi and the nation demand creative and innovative responses if we are to realize the potential that the future holds for our citizens. Our best hope for increased prosperity, health and quality of life for all lies in our ability to take advantage of the full range of talents and perspectives available to us.”

  • Broadband connects the dots in telecom

    It’s another one of those lists with New Mexico bringing up the rear. The subject is broadband access.

    New Mexico ranks 46th nationally in Internet use and 36th in broadband (high-speed Internet) telecommunications, according to the U. S. Department of Commerce. About 78 percent of New Mexicans have DSL, compared with 82 percent nationally; 77 percent have access to cable modem, compared with 96 percent nationally.

  • Feds should stop “Taj Majal”

    Huge investments intended for additional plutonium infrastructure at Los Alamos National Laboratory raise equally big questions. Specifically, will current plans make the best use of the growing billions of dollars now claimed necessary to do the job? Can these enormous costs really be justified?

    Or is there already evidence that these projects are simply out of control?

  • Our View: Blogs are great, but readers beware

    In today’s world of rapid pace, warp speed information delivery it sometimes seems as though everything happened yesterday. The Internet and cable television have delivered unto us a 24/7 news cycle, which can, in times of disasters, be a good thing. Other times, maybe not, such as when broadcasters are obviously reaching to fill time with yawn-inspiring stories.