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Today's News

  • Big 12 lives to play another day

    AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Staring at extinction, the Big 12 is once again in play.

    The beleaguered conference made a rousing comeback Monday, when Texas declined an invitation to join the Pac-10 and decided to stay in the Big 12.

    Oklahoma, Oklahoma State and Texas A&M quickly followed the Longhorns by recommitting to the conference after commissioner Dan Beebe convinced his members they would make more money in television and media deals in a 10-team Big 12 then in a 16-team Pac-10.

  • Cycling: Calvert, Baum repeat as top riders in Pajarito Punishment

    It was a repeat win for both the top competitors at this 2010 Pajarito Punishment.

    The Pajarito Punishment, a New Mexico Off-Road Series race, was held Saturday at Pajarito Mountain. The Punishment is considered one of the toughest races in the NMORS. In all, 151 riders finished Saturday’s race.

  • Applications being accepted for grants

    PHOENIX — The Internal Revenue Service recently announced the opening of the 2011 Low Income Taxpayer Clinic (LITC) grant application process. Applications must be submitted no later than July 16, 2010.

    “The Low Income Taxpayer Clinics are vital to taxpayers who need help with tax problems but lack resources,” IRS Commissioner Doug Shulman said. “The grant program’s goal is to develop and expand these important services for low income taxpayers.”

  • Technology tracks carbon dioxide

    ALBUQUERQUE — Scientists have developed a method for detecting and tracking carbon dioxide deep underground, giving the federal government an important tool as people look for ways to keep carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases from crowding the atmosphere.

    Scientists working with the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory used colorless, nontoxic liquids called perflourocarbon tracers to essentially fingerprint carbon dioxide that was injected into a coal seam in northwestern New Mexico.

  • An effort toward peace

    Some ideas seem meant to be when things fall easily into place as local veterinarian Bob Fuselier is finding in his endeavor to create an Afghan Sister Village Project.

    “This started late last year when I was watching a program on Afghanistan,” Fuselier told an audience assembled at Trinity of the Hill Episcopal Church Wednesday. They were there to hear about Fuselier’s project and to listen to Col. Jay Mitchell, USAF, discuss Afghanistan.

  • Students’ hard work earns an award

    Sixteen students were awarded the Los Alamos Public Schools Foundation scholarship. Each student selected demonstrated a balance of academic excellence, extracurricular participation and community service throughout their high school career.  

    The winners have chosen an Educator of Distinction; this is an education professional who had a positive impact on the student’s time in the Los Alamos Public Schools

    The LAPS Foundation is a nonprofit organization that enriches the educational experience of students through community investment.

  • Create a demand for sludge

    Creating shallow tar pits at known illegal border crossings may make the proverbial “wheels to spin” for drug and gun traffickers.

    Bird poop on your car is less good than guano mining.  Potentates are impotent because they are approaching the oil spill like car wash kids.

    They need to create a demand for the sludge. Pothole fixers benefit us more than blamers and feasibility studiers.  

    Petr Jandacek

    Los Alamos

  • Wake up, America

    Several alarming things are happening in our country.  As we go about our daily work, Congress continues spending money that we don’t have.

  • Owning a piece of the American dream

    For many of us, sleeping every night in a safe and comfortable home is something we take for granted — but that’s not the case for all families. However, for those families there are opportunities to buy a house to call home — even in these trying economic times.

    Several Federal agencies have proclaimed June National Homeownership Month. This month we recognize the role homeownership plays as the foundation of America’s economy and how it provides stability in our communities.

  • N.M. doesn’t need a Plum Book

    SANTA FE — “If I’m elected governor, I’ll fire every single political appointee.” Sound familiar? You’ve likely heard that promise from every single gubernatorial candidate for almost a year.

    We’re down to only two candidates now and this is one campaign promise you can expect either of them to keep. Governors always do. They want their own trusted individuals around them, not the former governor’s buddies.