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Today's News

  • Wells joins news team

    The Los Alamos Monitor has brought onboard a 20-year veteran journalist with an investigative and business reporting background as its new editor.

    “It’s my pleasure to announce that following an extensive national search, Garrison Wells has joined the paper to lead the news operation,” said Monitor Publisher Keven Todd. “Garrison not only brings solid traditional journalistic skills to the table, but he also possesses the multimedia skills needed to add an even deeper dimension to the strides we’re making at lamonitor.com.”

  • History bites the dust

    From 1945 to 1978, DP West at Los Alamos National Laboratory was a critical player in the hushed world of nuclear warheads.

    This cluster of buildings, described by LANL officials as “wings off of a central hallway,” was where a liquid solution of plutonium from Hanford Plant in Washington State was extracted, processed into metal and shaped into cores for nuclear weapons.

    The plutonium was then used in nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site and in the Pacific.

  • LAPS expects $250,000 for solar project

    Fifty-kilowatts may seem like a tiny spark of energy, but generated through solar photovoltaic electric systems, the benefits light up in a hurry.

    Los Alamos Public Schools is among 15 New Mexico school districts picked to receive federal stimulus funds to build ground-base photovoltaic solar electric array systems.

    A total of $4.5 million will be awarded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment State Energy Program.

  • Support and celebrate your local media

    It was gratifying to see a positive outcome for KRSN in this week’s decision from the Planning & Zoning Commission. While the fact that the AM radio station got a green light to proceed with construction of an antenna on school property does not guarantee its future, had the commission’s decision gone the other way the media outlet’s fate would have surely been sealed.

  • Tales of Batman and G.I. Joe

    Dr. Hook sings this memorable ditty by Shel Silverstein:

    “Rolling Stone

    Wanna see my picture on the cover.

    Rolling Stone

    Wanna buy five copies for my mother.”

    Two guys who didn’t buy five copies for their mothers are Gen. Stanley McChrystal and our very own Val Kilmer. Batman and G.I. Joe didn’t have a lot in common until lately, when the yogurt hit the fan over their published words in Rolling Stone magazine.

  • UPDATE: Griggs, Norman take Atomic City titles Saturday

    Ev Griggs added to her impressive list of accolades Saturday at the Atomic City Invitational.

  • Mom, what about this?

    Los Alamos Little Theatre (LALT) fans may know her as a director-costumer-stage manager, while Los Alamos Light Opera-goers may know her as a performer.  However, Los Alamos native Mimi Adams unveils a new side to her theatrical talent: playwright.  “Endless Questions,” Adams’ first full-length one-act play, debuts this weekend on the LALT stage as the culmination of a workshop experience long in the making.  

  • Unemployment rate drops as discouraged jobseekers give up search for work

    WASHINGTON (AP) — A wave of census layoffs cut the nation's payrolls in June for the first time in six months, while private employers added a modest number of jobs. The unemployment rate fell to 9.5 percent, its lowest level in almost a year.

    Employers cut 125,000 jobs last month, the most since October, the Labor Department said Friday. The loss was driven by the end of 225,000 temporary census jobs.

  • USAID compound attacked in Afghanistan, 4 killed

    KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — Six suicide bombers stormed a USAID compound in northern Afghanistan before dawn Friday, killing at least four people and wounding several others, officials said. At least two of the dead were foreigners.

  • Prosecutors: NY suspect spilled Russia spy details

    NEW YORK (AP) — Within hours of his capture, U.S. prosecutors say, Russian spy suspect Juan Lazaro admitted his name was an alias.

    So who is he? Lazaro wasn't saying — not "even for his son," court papers say.

    Lazaro's admission — and defiance — was revealed Thursday by federal prosecutors arguing against bail for him, his wife and another couple with children. The U.S. government claims those defendants and seven others were part of a spy ring on assignment to infiltrate America's cities and suburbs for the Russian intelligence service.