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Today's News

  • Scientific journals are still credible

    I see my name in a “Guest Column” from the July 9 Monitor where my friend Don Peterson writes about troubling aspects of the global warming issue.

  • Co-op enters home stretch

    After four years spent brainstorming, fundraising and signing up several hundred members, walls on the Los Alamos Cooperative Market are about to go up. The land is being prepared for the foundation under the 7,000-foot store, work crew subcommittees are being formed and the search for a manager is underway.

  • High speed chase leads to recovery of abducted Missouri boy in NM

    PREWITT, N.M. (AP) — New Mexico police early Monday found an abducted 5-year-old Missouri boy safe in the back seat of a car after officers were fired on during a highway chase that at times exceeded 100 mph on Interstate 40.

    State police Lt. Eric Garcia identified the boy as 5-year-old Devon Denman. Missouri authorities had been looking for him since Saturday, when his father reported the child's mother took the boy at gunpoint.

  • Recharging the spiritual batteries

    Everyone has felt as though they were stuck in a rut. The routine feels too familiar and perhaps a little flat. Sometimes a change is in order – to shake things up and re-energize people.

    Grace Vineyard Christian Fellowship is following this attitude with two upcoming conferences.

    The first one, which begins today and runs through Sunday, features John Sullivan, Jr., the son of the church’s pastor, Rev. Jack Sullivan. Sullivan, Jr. will be accompanied by his wife, Sofia and Kolynn Hansen.

  • Los Alamos youth excel at unique competition

    Running, shooting, swimming and horse riding – these are well-established sports but combined altogether, something unique arises.

    A tetrathlon may sound unusual but it is a sport that is widely held.

    Additionally, three girls from Los Alamos recently proved they excel at this sport.

    Madeline Beck, Rachel Brenner and Mariah Bayless of the Los Alamos Pony Club achieved first place as a team in the Rocky Mountain Regional Mega Rally Tetrathlon.

  • Historic Society looks for guidance

    For 42 years, the Los Alamos Historical Society has operated the Los Alamos History Museum but as the society turns its attention to the house formerly owned by Dr. J. Robert Oppenheimer, it finds itself in unfamiliar territory.

    Fortunately, the historic society earned a $3,750 grant from the New Mexico Humanities Council as well as a $2,400 grant from the National Trust for Historic Preservation. These grants will offer guidance to the society as it begins initial steps to operate a historic home museum.

  • ‘Magic Flute’ emits a lack luster note

    After the excitement, sturm und drang of Friday night’s season opening, Saturday’s second opening felt more relaxed, less crowded, more casual, less pressured  and the weather was calmer, too.  

    Mozart’s “The Magic Flute” (1791) is the ultimate kid friendly opera, and we did indeed see several beautiful little girls in beautiful little dresses; but I’m sorry to say this production will leave the kids bored instead of dazzled.

  • Lab nabs top tech awards

    A super high speed camera.

    Green explosives.

    A way to pull fuel from algae using sound waves.

    Those are a few of the projects that netted five top awards for Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists.

    The R&D Magazine’s R&D 100 Awards honor the top 100 proven technological advances of the past year.

    “This work benefits us all by enhancing America’s competitiveness, ensuring our security, providing new energy solutions and expanding the frontiers of our knowledge,” said Energy Secretary Steven Chu, in a news release.

  • DPS move will slow crime, save money

    The Department of Public Safety Forensic Laboratory will assume control of the State DNA Administrative Center starting in October — a move  that will trim weeks when inputting felon DNA information into the statewide database and save about $400,000 a year, according to the DPS.

    Today it takes six to eight weeks for this DNA information to be entered into the database for law enforcement use.

    DPS estimates it will take about two weeks once the Northern Forensic Laboratory assumes responsibility.

  • Candidates’ positions are as thin as the economy

    A water expert I know complained last week that the candidates for governor haven’t said a word about water, one of the state’s biggest issues. But you can name about any subject and come to the same conclusion.

    Instead, the candidates have chosen to wrangle over perverts and who’s running the dirtier campaign. It’s surprising that Diane Denish would start with crime, which is Martinez’s strength, instead of her own, which is business and the economy.