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Today's News

  • Winchell’s last day on the job

    Today is playing out like any other work day for Donald L. Winchell, Jr.

    He’s been on a term limited three-year appointment as the National Nuclear Security Administration’s Los Alamos Site Office manager and said this morning that he’ll finish out today like any other, even though it’s his last day on the job.

    Deputy Site Manager Roger Snyder will serve as acting site manager until Kevin Smith comes on board Aug. 29, Winchell said.

    Meantime, leisure beckons.

  • County gets 9-acre gift from NNSA

    Los Alamos County just got a gift.

    The county received a 9-acre tract of land from the National Nuclear Security Administration’s Los Alamos site Office. The land was the organization’s former home office.

    It is unclear yet what the county might decide to use the land for, said Julie Habiger, spokeswoman for the county.

  • Comcast to hike rates

    The average Comcast customer will see a 3.2 percent increase on their cable bill effective Aug. 1.

    “I don’t have the numbers in front of me but I believe that’s about what the increase was last fall,” Comcast Director of Public Affairs Chris Dunkeson said Wednesday. “This increase is reflective of two things, the combination of the increased cost of doing business and the fact that we continue to invest in new technology.”

  • Boards and commissions

    “There is no such thing as a Republican or Democratic audiologist. There are just professional audiologists.”  

    This comment was made in December 2002 by an audiologist of my acquaintance, after he received a letter informing him that he was being booted off the New Mexico audiology board. My friend was a very nice fellow, a responsible professional and, I’m sure, a diligent member of this board.

  • Pay cuts versus job cuts

    We are undergoing a test as a nation.

    Just days after our 244th birthday, we face real challenges from our streets up. From what we believe our government — at every level — needs to provide, to our part in what might be considered a free-for-all with our culture and economy at stake.

    Consider that the July 4 news shows found the economy on the lips of nearly every talking head. Bottom line: Our nation’s bottom line looks to be heading south again.

  • Finding value in trash

    Piñon Elmentary School PTO President Gloria Brehm introduced Terracycle to the school last year and the results have been significant.

    Three thousand juice pouches have been given to TerraCycle, a company that turns non-recyclable waste into eco-friendly products.

    Additionally, 1,000 chip bags have been shipped to the company. The PTO does receive a small fee for its waste. For instance, the PTO receives 2 cents per juice pouch and has earned a total of $60.

  • Police want help in finding suspect tied to Taos double murder

    TAOS, N.M. (AP) — Two northern New Mexico teenagers are dead, found shot in the head before dawn Monday in a vehicle that still had its headlights on.

    Taos County Undersheriff Edwardo Romero identifies them as 19-year-old Chayne Aragon Dominguez of the El Prado area and 17-year-old Sefran Lujan of the Ranchos de Taos area.

    Romero says a deputy heading home about 4 a.m. Monday spotted the car on a Carson National Forest road off N.M. 518.

    The deputy found the bodies slouched in the front seat with blood on their heads.

  • News Alert: County Settles Tort Claim

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  • Bloomfield woman facing sex assault charges

    FARMINGTON, N.M. (AP) — A 32-year-old Bloomfield woman has been charged with four counts of criminal sexual penetration of a child.

    Police say Amanda Polanco had sex with a 15-year-old boy at least four times in March and April. She was arrested May 2 and released on bond from the San Juan County Adult Detention Center.

    Polanco appeared in Farmington District Court Monday. Her arraignment was postponed for two weeks.

  • Kagan: Harvard Law's $476 million dean

    WASHINGTON (AP) — One talent Supreme Court nominee Elena Kagan displayed in her career climb could create unique ethics questions for her as a justice: the ability to persuade Harvard Law School alumni and other wealthy donors to give hundreds of millions of dollars, more than meeting a daunting fundraising goal that came with her job as dean.