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Today's News

  • Hilltopper boys win, girls are second at La Cueva Saturday

    The Los Alamos Hilltopper boys cross country team placed five runners in the top 10 individually to earn a solid victory in the La Cueva Invitational Saturday.
    Los Alamos held off three Class 5A schools to take the win in the boys race Saturday. Paced by senior Alexander Romero, the Hilltoppers finished with 25 points, just slightly more than half total of runner-up Volcano Vista.
    Only five girls teams and four boys teams took part in the La Cueva Invitational, a departure from last week’s race, the University of New Mexico Invitational, which is one of the biggest meets in the state.

  • Sports Schedule, Sept. 12-17

    Monday

    Football: Moriarty at Los Alamos, C team, 4:30 p.m.

     

    Tuesday

    Girls soccer: La Cueva at Los Alamos, JV, 4 p.m.; varsity, 6 p.m.

    Boys soccer: Los Alamos at La Cueva, varsity, JV, 6:30 p.m.

    Volleyball: LAMS at West Las Vegas, seventh grade, 4 p.m.; eighth grade, 5 p.m.

     

    Wednesday

    Cross country: LAMS Invite, boys and girls, 4 p.m.

    Boys soccer: Los Alamos at Santa Fe Waldorf, C team, 4:30 p.m.

    Volleyball: St. Michael's at Los Alamos, C team 4 p.m.; JV, 5 p.m.; varsity, 6:30 p.m.

     

    Thursday

    Football: Bernalillo at LAMS, 4 p.m.

    Girls soccer: Rio Rancho at Los Alamos, JV, 4 p.m.; varsity, 6 p.m.

  • ’Toppers pick up OT win vs. Chargers

    The Los Alamos Hilltopper girls soccer team bounced back from a disappointing loss in the semifinal round of the Albuquerque Academy Invitational to knock off its arch-rival in the third-place game Saturday.
    Los Alamos was topped in the tournament Friday afternoon, 3-1, by eventual champion Las Cruces. Saturday, however, Los Alamos scored late in the first overtime period against the host Academy Chargers to pick up a 2-1 victory.
    The Chargers and the Hilltoppers have met three consecutive years in the Class 4A championship game, with the Chargers winning all three games.

  • LA can’t slow Scorps’ ground game

    The powerful ground attack of the Farmington Scorpions was more than enough to upset the home opener of the Los Alamos Hilltopper football team Friday night.
    Los Alamos entertained Farmington Friday night, its first game of 2011 at Sullivan Field and its new, refurbished artificial surface. But neither turf nor the on-and-off showers nor, unfortunately, the Hilltopper defense, could do much to slow the Scorpions, who rolled up 224 yards in the first half, 214 of it coming on the first half.
    Farmington scored on three of its opening four possessions and cruised to a 41-0 win over Los Alamos. It was Los Alamos’ second straight shutout loss against an opponent from the Four Corners area.

  • We’re safer post 9/11

    All of us who are old enough remember exactly where we were on Sept. 11, 2001, at the moment we first learned that terrorists had taken control of commercial jetliners and crashed them into the World Trade Center in Manhattan, the Pentagon, and a field in Shanksville, Pa.
    On that day, our lives, our country, and our world fundamentally changed.
    Today, a decade later, we remember the loss of the nearly 3,000 innocent victims of the attacks, honor the firefighters, police, and many other first responders, who showed such courage and conviction on that tragic day, and take stock of the fundamental changes that have reshaped our country and improved security for all Americans.

  • Dancing with death

    Once I had a case of influenza so bad I missed close to a month of graduate school.  I ran a fever and coughed until it felt like my whole world was turned upside down.
    Because I’m a geologist, not a medical doctor, I nicknamed that bout of illness “the plague.”  But what I experienced was a walk in the park compared to the real McCoy.
    The sheer virulent power of plague is a tale of human history that’s a warning ringing across the centuries. But the story takes its most interesting turn recently, as science has been unraveling more and more mysteries of the Black Death.
    The first widespread outbreak of the plague we know about started in 541 A.D.  

  • Recounting 9/11 at Pentagon

    Ike Richardson has been at the Los Alamos National Laboratory as deputy director since 2009.
    But before coming to LANL, Richardson spent 31 years of his life in the U.S. Navy, where he attained the rank of Rear Admiral.

    Back in 2001, he had just completed a tour on the USS Nimitz, a nuclear-powered aircraft carrier and he was starting his new job at the Pentagon at the beginning of September.

    He and his wife Donna had just moved to the Washington area and they were staying in a hotel in Crystal City, Va., within walking distance of the Pentagon.

    Sept. 11 started like any other morning for Richardson. He was in his office on the fourth floor early for a staff meeting.

  • The New Solitary Face of Terrorism

    After Sept. 11, 2001, it was the men who went to radicalized mosques or terror boot camps who were perceived as the biggest threat to society. Today, authorities are increasingly focusing on the solitary person living right next door – someone who may have been radicalized on the Internet and plotting strikes in a vacuum.

    “It’s the lone wolf who is our biggest concern,” said Jack Killeen, Safeguards and Security Division leader at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    Killeen and LANL Security Group Leader Mike Wismer discussed lone wolf terrorism during a recent interview.

  • Injured pedestrian recovers well

    Lois Coffin was one of the citizens attending last Tuesday night’s council debate concerning changes to Trinity Drive. Coffin had a personal interest in the issue: she was struck by a 16-year-old driving a pickup truck as she walked across Trinity Drive at Oppenheimer on July 26.

    After impact, Coffin saw the truck still coming toward her and managed to roll out of the way. One of the wheels was less than two feet from her head when the driver stopped. “I tried to stay focused when it happened,” Coffin said. “I just happened to be very lucky it wasn’t worse. Circumstances could so easily have been different.”

  • Animal Shelter 09-11-11

    The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of on-site adoptable pets; others are in foster care with loving, temporary homes.
    It’s summer, remember that pets also suffer when the temperature rises. Cooling animals (dogs, rabbits, cats) by giving them a “cool” bath or shower to help keep their body temperature down.
    A cool towel on a tile floor to lay on, a cool towel or washcloth laying over the skin, next to a fan will also help cool the animal.
    Make sure they have plenty of cool water to drink as well.
    Signs of heat stroke in a pet are: rapid panting, wide eyes, lots of drooling, hot skin, twitching muscles, vomiting and a dazed look. Call your vet if you think your pet has heat stroke.