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Today's News

  • Zozobra's organizers hope to limit crowd

    SANTA FE — Organizers of the Santa Fe’s annual burning of Zozobra are hoping to keep crowd numbers in check.
    KKOB-AM reports that tickets for this year’s Sept. 8 event will have bar codes in an effort to keep the crowd to below 25,000 at Santa Fe’s Fort Marcy Park.
    The burning of the white marionette precedes the Fiesta de Santa Fe weekend in New Mexico’s capital.
    The fiery ritual is intended to burn away a year’s worth of troubles.
    Event producer Ray Valdez says said the biggest crowd at Zozobra was in 1993 when around 33,000 people attended but the annual event then was on a Friday evening.
    He said the event was moved to Thursday night a few years later.

    The Associated Press

  • Police Beat 08-30-11

    Police Beat items are compiled from public information contained in Los Alamos Police Department records. Charges or citations listed in Police Beat do not imply innocence or guilt.

    Aug. 18
    6:41 p.m. – Torey Semi, 47, of Denver was arrested on East Jemez Road and charged with possession of a controlled substance.

    Aug. 19

    12:46 a.m. – Nicholas Conner, 29, of Los Alamos was arrested on Arkansas Avenue and charged with possession of a controlled substance, DWI and unlawful carrying of a deadly weapon.              

  • Update 08-31-11

    Movie night
     
    The Mesa Public Library Free Film Series will show “The Social Network” at 6:30 p.m., Thursday.

    Fuller Lodge

     The Fuller Lodge Historic Districts Advisory Board will meet at 5 p.m. Sept. 7 in the Curtis Room.

    Public meeting

    The White Rock Implementation Committee and Los Alamos County will host the third public meeting on the A-19-a master plan project at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday at the White Rock Fire Station.

    County Council

     The Los Alamos County Council will meet at 7 p.m. Sept. 6 in council chambers.

  • Governor to seek road money in special session

    SANTA FE — Gov. Susana Martinez’s administration plans to ask the Legislature to provide $41 million for road maintenance across the state to help offset costs the Transportation Department incurred paying its share for the Rail Runner commuter train system.
    The Republican governor wants lawmakers to provide the money in a capital improvement financing bill during a special legislative session, which is to start next week.
    The administration developed the request after reviewing the Rail Runner’s long-term costs to the state. A new analysis by the Department of Finance and Administration estimates the commuter rail operation is costing an average of $65 million, with the state picking up the biggest share of that.

  • Biz consultant rates Los Alamos

    The first thing that struck a business consultant visiting Los Alamos recently was that the town has “huge potential.”
    “I already knew that this is a community with many professional people and many highly educated people with strong incomes,” said Jon Schallert of The Schallert Group in Colorado. “I think the biggest challenge is that the business people here aren’t hungry like most of the rest of the country. I found many of the businesses doing ok — not thriving but not starving — so many are complacent and not doing the cutting edge kinds of marketing technologies that most of the country is doing.”

  • CRC Tackles Initiative & Referendum

    The Initiative & Referendum subcommittee presented its proposed changes to the Charter Review Committee Monday evening. The subcommittee’s focus was on clarifying and simplifying the Initiative, Referendum and Recall sections of the County Charter, but included some substantive changes as well.
    The committee worked closely with the County Clerk’s office to discover weaknesses in the current Charter, and conducted public meetings for citizens input. They decided a comprehensive rewrite of this section of the Charter was necessary.

  • DOE inspector issues report on lab remediation

    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 funded work at the Los Alamos National Laboratory as apart of an estimated $2.2 billion to remediate the lab by December of 2015.

    In February 2009, the Recovery Act was enacted and the National Nuclear Security Adminstration received $212 million for legacy environmental remediation projects at the lab with most of the work being targeted at Technical Area-21.

  • Managing epidemics: an argument against blanket job cuts

    The unvaccinated woman got on a plane in London. She flew to Washington, D.C., changed planes and flew to Denver, then on to Albuquerque, and from there drove home to Santa Fe.  She had measles.  
    During the trip, she exposed other passengers from all over the world to this disease.
    Preventing an epidemic involved 70 countries and four states, and cost $1 million, according to Dr. Chad Smelser, an epidemiologist with the New Mexico Department of Health.
    A few other thought-provoking highlights from a recent presentation by Smelser:

  • Jet served a purpose

    There is just something about a jet…
    The governor won headlines for selling the “ultimate symbol of waste and excess,” an executive jet purchased by her predecessor, for less than half its purchase price.
    It was an unwise acquisition in the first place, and its fire sale during a recession is questionable, but hey, we’re talking symbols here.
    As a corporate public relations person in the 1970s, it was my responsibility to explain the Lear jet purchased and used by executives of PNM, the state’s biggest utility.
    Management saw it as a tool. Long before cell phones and laptops, their frequent trips east to raise money meant they were difficult to reach, and the prevailing concern was to minimize their time away.

  • Finishing Touches

    Crews worked late Monday night on Sullivan Field. Here a cart drops small pieces of rubber onto the new artificial surface. Work at Sullivan Field started in mid-May.