Today's News

  • Daffodils for hospice

    Don Casperson and Katelyn Littleton of the Key Club helped deliver daffodils, which was part of the Visiting Nurse Service Daffodils for Hospice sale. This year, 2,500 bunches had been sold by March 2.

  • Safety board assigns new rep to LANL

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board announced the assignment of Richard Verhaagen as Site Representative at the Department of Energy’s Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    Verhaagen will replace Brett Broderick and join Todd Davis, the board’s current Site Representative at LANL, in July 2012.

    As a Site Representative, Verhaagen will advise the board on the overall safety conditions at LANL defense nuclear facilities and will participate in technical reviews by the board and its staff related to the design, construction, operation, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities.

  • Lab alums could bolster business

    The UNM-Los Alamos Small Business Development Center will host two community forums on Thursday to provide LANL employees who are eligible for voluntary separation with information about opportunities and resources available to them.  

    The first forum will take place at the Los Alamos Research Park, 4200 West Jemez Road, in conference room #202A, 12:00 – 1:00 p.m.  The second forum will be at The Hive, 134 State Road 4, in White Rock, 5:30-6:30 p.m.  

  • Update 03-13-12

    Town hall meeting

    Republican Senate candidate Heather Wilson will hold a town hall meeting at 4:30 p.m. Wednesday at the Best Western Hilltop House Hotel. The public is invited.

    Council meeting

    County Council will hold a regular session at 6 p.m. March 20 in Council Chambers.

    Planning and zoning

    The Planning and Zoning Commission will meet at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday at the council chambers.

    BPU meeting

    The Board of Public Utilities will meet at 5:30 p.m., March 21, at 170 Central Park Square.

    LANL meetings

  • Site Office names deputy manager

    The Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration today announced selection of Espanola native Juan Griego as Deputy Site Manager for the Los Alamos Site Office (LASO).

    Griego, who has served as deputy manager for the past seven months, will report to LASO Manager Kevin Smith.

    “I’m extremely pleased to have Juan as my deputy manager,” Smith said. “His breadth and depth of experience coupled with his skilled leadership will certainly help serve the Los Alamos Site Office well and contribute to the success of the laboratory.”

  • Legion cited in sting operation

    Official documents recently obtained show that last month’s liquor license compliance sting included more establishments than originally reported.

    The report initially showed that two Los Alamos establishments sold alcohol to a minor, but a recent review of the state Public Safety Department’s report of that operation indicates that the American Legion Post #90 was also named in the report for serving alcohol to two non-members – two undercover police officers.

    The report stated that Legion server Clene Cusuman was cited twice for failing to ask the two men, who came in to the establishment through the Fabulous 50’s Diner, if they were members before serving them each a 12-ounce beer.

  • Futuristic technology set for test in town

    It almost sounds like science fiction: smart meters talking to smart grids and passing the word on to smart appliances. But — as the Smart House will demonstrate — that technology already exists today. However, its practical application is likely to be some years in the future.

    As with any new technology, smart meters are highly variable in their capacities. Their greatest potential allows them to function as the brain center of a house, deciding where to draw power (from the grid, batteries, or solar panels) and then determine how to allocate it to appliances and climate control systems.

  • Businesses brace to take a hit

    POJOAQUE — An attempt at light humor from Los Alamos National Laboratory Executive Director Richard Marquez fell on deaf ears during a community forum Monday to discuss the lab’s budget slashing efforts.

    But one question from an attendee about how the lab’s cuts may affect the local economy set a dour tone for the night.

    Northern New Mexico businesses face losing more than $30 million, or a third, of lab contracts, Marquez said.

    And in addition to the highly publicized voluntary layoffs currently underway, the lab is also looking to cut $150 million in goods and services because of decreased revenue.

    At some point, there will be more expenditures than the budget has coming in, Marquez said.

  • Parties would block CCC idea

        A look back at our nation’s Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) in the 1930s shows the CCC met many needs like those we have today. The CCC model might help again, with a bit of work.
    CCC ideas could have value today, except for our biggest problem. Today’s habit is to ax ideas with ideology.
    The trick is so easy that the ideology of either party can stop any idea the wrong guys raise.
     Strange to tell, the other party’s ideology stops the same idea just as easily. So either party making a proposal dooms it.
    The history of the CCC confirms a proud legacy and scripts the catchwords that kill the thought. A queer hello.  

  • Standing up for Luján

     It appears that there are some misleading statements in the ViewPoint article the Los Alamos Monitor published Sunday, March 11. Mr. Newton states that Congressman Ben Ray Luján  “has chosen the narrow partisan interest of President Obama over the jobs of highly skilled workers in northern New Mexico.”
     If Mr. Newton had done his research he would have seen that Congressman Lujan did not support the Budget Reduction Act that the Tea Party group fiercely fought for in Congress.
    The Tea Party’s demand was for drastic cuts to government spending all across the country that would immediately eliminate jobs wherever there was a cut in funding. That some of these cuts should affect Los Alamos, although tragic, is no surprise.