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Today's News

  • Copper thieves target federal sites

    A worldwide shortage has sparked copper thieves to steal wiring from anywhere they can find it including local telephone poles. Reports also indicate that about 30,000 pounds of copper was been stolen from the Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    Copper thefts at LANL actually have involved a few pounds up to a few hundred pounds from salvage, spokesman Kevin Roark said this morning.

    “We are looking in to this but our initial estimates indicate the actual number to be significantly less than the 30,000 pounds,” Roark said. “We have not experienced any significant copper theft since 2009 … There were a couple of incidents in 2006 and 2007 … all allegations were referred to local and federal law enforcement at the time.”

  • Hay hauler hung up

    About 2:30 p.m. Thursday, above the back gate at the hairpin turn, this truck became wedged and it took about 30  minutes for workers to free it and get traffic moving again.

  • Long drought breaks records

    Precipitation rankings from January through July of this year are the driest on record for New Mexico, according to the National Weather Service. Los Alamos rainfall is 7.93 inches below normal at just 1.64 inches to date.

    Los Alamos National Laboratory Meteorologist Scot Johnson said there are two factors driving the drought locally and elsewhere around the country.

    “La Niña, the cold in the Pacific along the equator driving north and the other situation is the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) located in the northern Pacific,” Johnson said. “So you have a negative PDO right now and the two working together contributed to the dry spring.”

  • Just A Wag 08-19-11

    Smile for the camera

    Some angry parents are telling us that they are fed up with students smoking around Los Alamos High School, despite posted no smoking signs, and intend to snap photos of the smokers for Facebook.

    Send us your wags

    “Just a wag” features initial snippets of news heard around town.  The wags may grow to larger stories or simply remain snippets, either way this is meant to spark interest and provide food for thought.
    E-mail wags to lanews@lamonitor.com.

  • Expect redistricting fireworks

    New Mexico’s 2011 legislative redistricting of state political boundaries promises to be unique in terms of timing, content and politics.
    September special sessions are not unusual in New Mexico but a special session beginning this early in the month is rare.
    Redistricting special sessions normally are confined to that topic plus a few non-controversial items of a truly emergency nature. Not so this year.
    Until 10 years ago, New Mexico’s decennial redistricting sessions were fairly devoid of politics. The 2001 session shows us what likely will happen this year.

  • The more things change

    It’s human nature to cling to the familiar. We look at the way things are and we are comforted by the fact that things have always been this way and they’ll always stay this way.  
    Things that cost more are always better than things that cost less. Chicken soup will always cure any illness. The Earth has always revolved around the Sun.  
    And men have always been smarter than women (just don’t tell my wife I said that.)
    Life just seems to make more sense when we ignore the simple fact that things do change.
    One of my favorite subjects of change is standard units of measure. Take the inch for example. What could be more firmly rooted in history than the common inch?

  • State Briefs 08-19-11

    State proposes changes to water quality standards

    SANTA FE — The state Environment Department is considering changes to surface water quality standards for New Mexico lakes and it wants to hear from the public before making a decision.
    The department is proposing to classify about 70 lakes around the state into new “lake-only” segments.
    Currently, lakes are often classified with nearby streams even though they may differ significantly from those streams.
    Officials say having a separate classification would allow them to conduct more accurate assessments of water quality.
    The department is planning two public meetings, including one in Santa Fe on Aug. 24 and the other in Roswell on Aug. 30.

  • Seen at the Scene: Summer Concert Series

    The community came out to enjoy the Gordon’s Concert at Ashley Pond on Aug. 12. The final concert of the summer series  is at 7 p.m. today at Del Norte Credit Union, featuring Carolyn Wonderland.

  • Thanks from IHM

    To thank the county police and firefighters, Immaculate Heart of Mary Parish invited all police and fire fighters  and their families to be the honored guests during the annual picnic at the Church Aug. 7.  Above, Rev. John Carney presents St. Michael the Archangel medals to police and St. Florian medals to firefighters, following his blessing. He thanked them for all they do for the community on a daily basis and especially during  the Las Conchas Fire.

  • Crash snarls Thursday evening traffic on Hill

    Two single-car crashes within seconds of each other caused a major traffic jam Thursday night on N.M. State Road 4, heading eastbound near Mile Marker 7.

    “Technically, it was two single-vehicle crashes,” said Lieutenant Joe McLaughlin of the Santa Fe County Sheriff’s Department. “But it was one accident.”

    The first vehicle to crash, a 2006 Pontiac, was driven by Alex Velarde, 55, of Santa Fe.

    “He hit some standing water, hit the guard rail on the right side and crossed over the center and hit the jersey barrier,” McLaughlin said.

    McLaughlin said Velarde was transported to Christus St. Vincent Hospital in Santa Fe with unspecified injuries, but he believed they were not serious.