.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Baseball: Toppers open district at Bernalillo

    To say that the 2011 District 2AAAA baseball title race is up for grabs is something of an understatement.
    That race officially got underway today with a pair of games. One of those games featured the Los Alamos Hilltoppers and the Bernalillo Spartans, who locked horns at Bernalillo.
    Los Alamos will be looking to overcome a rough nondistrict schedule, in which it went 3-9. Despite its subpar won-loss record, however, Los Alamos has started to show signs of life, earning two wins in its last four outings and staying competitive with its last five opponents.
    The Hilltoppers were nipped on the road at Moriarty Saturday, falling 4-3, five days after holding on to beat Santa Fe Indian School 12-8 in Santa Fe.

  • Rebels retreat from Libya oil port under attack

    AJDABIYA, Libya (AP) — Moammar Gadhafi's ground forces recaptured a strategic oil town Wednesday and were close to taking a second, making new inroads in beating back a rebel advance toward the capital Tripoli. Western powers kept up the pressure to force Gadhafi out with new airstrikes to weaken his military, hints that they may arm the opposition and intense negotiations behind the scenes to find a country to give haven to Libya's leader of more than 40 years.

  • Stocks higher after payroll report, pharma deal

    NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks rose Wednesday as a strong payroll report and a big pharmaceutical deal overshadowed concerns about the nuclear crisis in Japan and the battle for control of Libya.

    The ADP National Employment Report said 201,000 new private sector jobs were added in March. That is roughly in line with the 210,000 analysts had expected, but investors were encouraged by a strong gain in small business hiring.

  • US offers $5 million bounty for ICE agent killers

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Obama administration on Wednesday offered an up to $5 million reward for information leading to the capture of the suspected drug traffickers who shot and killed a U.S. immigration agent and wounded another in Mexico last month.

    The State Department said its Narcotics Rewards Program would pay the amount to anyone coming forward with information that results in the arrest of those responsible for the February 15 attack that killed Jaime Zapata and wounded Victor Avila. Both men were agents with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

  • Safety hearing held for Arizona's nuke plant

    PHOENIX (AP) — Operators of the nation's largest nuclear power plant told Arizona utility regulators Tuesday the triple-reactor plant near Phoenix is safe and chances are remote that it could undergo a nuclear catastrophe such as the one in Japan.

    The Arizona Corporation Commission requested a special open hearing with officials from Arizona Public Service, the state's largest utility company, which runs the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station for a consortium of power companies.

  • US offers $5 million bounty for ICE agent killers

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Obama administration on Wednesday offered an up to $5 million reward for information leading to the capture of the suspected drug traffickers who shot and killed a U.S. immigration agent and wounded another in Mexico last month.

    The State Department said its Narcotics Rewards Program would pay the amount to anyone coming forward with information that results in the arrest of those responsible for the February 15 attack that killed Jaime Zapata and wounded Victor Avila. Both men were agents with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

  • FDA examines link between food dyes, hyperactivity

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The FDA is examining the link between dyes found in everyday foods and hyperactivity in children.

    At a two-day meeting starting Wednesday, an FDA advisory committee will decide whether available data links the dyes and the disorder. The panel will recommend Thursday whether the agency should further regulate dyes, do more studies on the issue or require better labeling of the additives. They could also recommend that the FDA do nothing at all.

  • House, Senate No. 2s battle over federal budget

    WASHINGTON (AP) — They're a pair of flamboyant lawyers who are fond of cameras and adept at messaging, two deputies with ambitions to land, someday, on top.

    So the emerging political warfare led by Democratic Sen. Chuck Schumer and Republican Rep. Eric Cantor, now playing out in multimedia form over the budget impasse, can resemble a Spy vs. Spy contest over some of the most serious issues facing Congress and the nation.

  • Syrian president blames protests on 'conspirators'

    DAMASCUS, Syria (AP) — Syrian President Bashar Assad blamed "conspirators" Wednesday for an extraordinary wave of dissent against his authoritarian rule, but he failed to lift the country's despised emergency law or offer any concessions in his first speech since the protests began nearly two weeks ago.

    Assad said Syria is facing "a major conspiracy" that aims to weaken this country of 23 million. The Assad family has ruled Syria for nearly 40 years, using the feared security services to monitor and control even the smallest rumblings of opposition. Draconian laws have all but eradicated civil liberties and political freedoms.

  • Bizarre: Volunteer fire department chief arrested

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — New Mexico authorities arrested a volunteer fire department chief after he called in multiple police and fire agencies for a brush fire and falsely claimed people were trapped in buildings.

    A spokesman for the Rio Arriba County Sheriff's Office says 53-year-old Velarde Volunteer Fire Department Chief Eddie Velarde was arrested and booked into jail Tuesday for disorderly conduct.

    The sheriff's office says Velarde was calling for a mass evacuation when none was needed. Velarde allegedly claimed people were trapped when officials say the fire was nowhere near any structures.

    Sheriff's officials say the only way to stop Velarde was to arrest him.