Today's News

  • Beverly Agnew dies at age 91

    Beverly Agnew, the wife of the laboratory’s third director, Harold Agnew, died Oct. 11 in Solana Beach, Calif., where the Agnew’s have lived for more than 30 years.

    Beverly Agnew was a Manhattan Project Lab employee who worked in the office of LANL’s first director, J. Robert Oppenheimer. She also served as Robert Bacher’s secretary in the Physics Division and in the former Gadget Division. Harold Agnew, now age 90, was LANL director from 1970 to 1979.

  • Fire chief's first day was a doozy

    Fire Chief Troy Hughes woke up early Monday morning, went for his typical three-mile run near his White Rock home and then made his way to his new office at the Fire Administration Building on East Road.

    That first day was a doozy for the new chief.

    “I spent a lot of time meeting people and learning the ins and outs of the department,” said Hughes who ended his first day at nearly 8 p.m., picking up food at Smith’s on Central Avenue.

    Hughes, 47, packed up and headed for Los Alamos last weekend after spending nearly 27 years with the Grand Island Fire Department in Nebraska, serving as chief since 2008.

  • Session addresses CDD priorities

    The Los Alamos Community Development Department (CDD) staff briefed county council on proposed Development Code changes at Tuesday’s work session.

    Steve Laurent, planner I, presented a more fully developed proposal for a Planned Development (or mixed use) zoning code, based upon council’s direction during a Sept. 20 work session.  

    Staff was asked to develop a plan that requires sufficient detail from the developer upfront so that council could make a well-informed decision on rezoning requests, yet not so detailed that costs would discourage proposed development.

  • Bulb planting at Los Alamos Middle School

    Los Alamos Middle School, State Farm and the Juvenile Justice Advisory Board will host bulb planting from 10:30-11:30 a.m. Monday  at LAMS to kickoff plans for a Planting Festival. Students will be asked to suggest ideas of what foods can be grown at the school. LAMS Principal Rex Kilburn is pictured with the State Farm Good Neighbear.

  • Be There 10-19-11

     In place of the October board meeting, the Juvenile Justice Advisory Board is hosting a retreat titled, “Making the Connection: Engaging and Communicating with Youth,” from noon-4 p.m. For more information, call 661-4097.
    The White Rock Family Friendly Film Series presents, “Spooky Buddies,” at 7 p.m. in the White Rock Town Hall.

  • Chamisa hosts online book fair through Nov. 8

    Chamisa Elementary is having an online book fair from Oct. 25 to Nov. 21.
    All books ordered online will be delivered free of charge to Chamisa after the book fair is over.
    There will also be a  school book fair at Chamisa from 7:30 a.m.-3:40 p.m. Oct. 28-Nov. 8.
    The funds raised will pay for the Accelerated Reader program, STAR literacy  program and books for the library.  They hope to raise at least $1,800 to fund their programs for another year.
    For more information, call Librarian Beverly Baker at 663-2470, or visit http://bookfairs.scholastic.com/homepage/chamisa.

  • Fall gardening class offered at PEEC

    Gardening instructor Martha Davis is returning to PEEC to teach “Things to Do in the Fall Garden,” from 7-9 p.m. Oct. 27 and is $18 for PEEC members and $20 for all others.  
    Many tasks should or can be done in the fall in preparation for the gardens of spring.
    A range of things from garlic and spinach to daffodils and trees can be planted. Fall also brings a wealth of materials for compost piles, mulch and new garden beds. Davis will tell participants how to make the best of their gardens in the fall for gardens next summer.  
    Master gardener Davis has taught many classes for PEEC.

  • Series of cooking classes offered

    For people with diabetes, selecting and preparing foods that are low in sugar, fat and sodium can be a challenge.  
    The Los Alamos Cooperative Extension Service, in partnership with the New Mexico Department of Health Diabetes Prevention and Control Program will offer a series of free cooking classes for people with diabetes and their family members or caretakers.
    Kitchen Creations classes are from 4-7 p.m. Oct. 27 and Nov. 3, 10 and 17 at the Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic Church Parish Hall, 3700 Canyon Road.

  • She's no packaged politician

    Heather Wilson knows her stuff. One would expect that, you might think, given that she represented Albuquerque in the House of Representatives for 10 years.
    Wilson, now a candidate for the U.S. Senate to replace retiring Jeff Bingaman, speaks in depth and detail about the challenges facing the United States.
    The point here is that Wilson is not an all-surface packaged bundle of talking points. Far from it. Further, I don’t see how she can be any more bona fide as a conservative.
    Wilson speaks with passion fueled in part by experiences during the two-plus years after her time in congress ended in 2008 and announcing her Senate candidacy in March of this year.
    I spoke to Wilson in mid-October at her Spartan campaign office in Albuquerque.

  • Protests for jobs fall on deaf Republican ears

    It was hardly surprising but nonetheless disconcerting when Senate Republicans shot down President Obama’s jobs legislation last week, refusing even to let it be debated on the Senate Floor.
    New Mexico’s junior U.S. senator, Democrat Tom Udall, was plainly frustrated. “Last night,” he said, “we again saw Republican opposition and abuse of senate rules to thwart important legislation to help struggling American families and small businesses.”
    When they’re not willfully damaging the economy by threatening to put the nation in default, they’re blocking measures to improve it with job creation measures.
    Impeding economic recovery has become an ill-disguised GOP goal, it would seem.