Today's News

  • Restaurant Inspections 03-22-12

    The following restaurant inspection reports were provided by the New Mexico Environment Department.

    Santa Fe

    Azur, 428 Agua Fria St.
    Date inspected: March 13
    Violations: Three high-risk violations for poor personal hygiene — hand sink in kitchen was used to store dirty dishes; there were no paper towels in the towel dispenser; and there was no soap available for this hand sink. All high-risk violations were corrected. Two low-risk violations, one for floors/walls/ceilings — the wall across from the undercounter freezer unit is cracked. Seal; some light bulbs in the exhaust hoods are burnt. Replace.

  • Spring Opera Tour begins April 12

    Once again, the individuals that make up The Santa Fe Opera Spring Opera Tour are getting ready to take to the highways and byways of New Mexico and Texas.
    The group consisting of Music Director Kirt Pavitt, Soprano Julia Ebner, Tenor Joshua Guerrero and Stage Manager Joel Atella, will load the Santa Fe Opera van with sets and costumes and take off for their month-long adventure and a brand new opera to share.
    Ebner was an apprentice singer in the 2011 season and Guerrero will be a first year apprentice this summer.
     “Avastar,” is an original work written by Pavitt and Stage Director Kathleen Clawson especially for the tour to engage students in the world of opera using contemporary themes.

  • Review: Getting to the bottom of 'The Rum Diary'

    Like most books by Hunter S. Thompson, the “Rum Diary” is not for everyone.
    His gonzo style of journalism probably doesn’t interest the masses and neither do his books.
    In fact, those not interested in journalism and his wild tales probably won’t be interested in his writing.
    Thompson’s style is sometimes hard to follow. It doesn’t always flow the way one would expect. It’s choppy, sometimes convoluted and sometimes strange. But that’s what makes his style so unique.

  • In the shadows

    Sometimes it’s ignored. Sometimes people afflicted with it are in denial. Other times, family members are helpless because they have no idea what to do about it, but mental illness isn’t something that will just go away.
    Those who are affected by it need to seek help and those that have family members suffering from it need seek help on their behalf.
    In an effort to spotlight on the subject, a group of people from Los Alamos and the surrounding areas will share their stories with Los Alamos residents at 7 p.m. Saturday at the Duane Smith Auditorium in a series of monologues titled, “Minds Interrupted: Stories of Lives Affected by Mental Illness.” Congressman Ben Ray Luján will introduce the stories.

  • Girls tennis sweeps match with Sundevils

    The Los Alamos Hilltopper girls tennis team thumped the Española Valley Sundevils 9-0 in their match Tuesday at Española Valley.
    Los Alamos didn’t lose a single set Tuesday despite shuffling its lineup considerably. Susanna Lucido played in the No. 1 singles spot and earned a 6-3, 6-4 victory over the Sundevils’ No. 1, Fran Lopez.
    Tuesday’s contest was the first time in nearly a decade Los Alamos has traveled to Española Valley. The tennis courts in Española Valley fell into disrepair and were unplayable until they were renovated in the offseason.
    Los Alamos’ top players will travel to the Carlsbad Invitational this weekend while the rest of its team will play in a tournament in Taos.

  • Commentary: Tebow walking into a chaotic situation

    NEW YORK — Chaotic, arrogant, sometimes even crass.
    And if you think the New York Jets are bad, you should see their fans.
    Welcome to The Big Apple, Tim Tebow. If you can make it there ... well, let’s just say the attention you received in Denver — the obsessing over your throwing technique, what kind of teammate you were, your religious beliefs, your musical preferences, where you went for dinner and, yes, even your Tebowing — will seem like a quick once-over compared to the microscope you’ll be under in Manhattan.
    “I think it’s a great market; it’s a great city,” Tebow said late Wednesday night.
    Better watch what you wish for.

  • Romero, Baron among top race finishers

    Alexander Romero won his second consecutive Run for Her Life 5-kilometer race Sunday.
    Romero was the top men’s finisher on the 5K course with his time of 19 minutes, 55 seconds.
    Run for Her Life, in its second year, is a fundraising event hosted by the local chapter of Hadassah. Proceeds from the 5K and 10K trail runs go to support research in the field of breast cancer.
    The event was held on the Mesa Trail near East Park.
    Romero nipped his older brother Nathan by four seconds to win the men’s 5K event. Kelly Sanchez was the women’s top overall finisher in the 5K with her time of 26:24.

  • Unhappy public not sure who to blame for high gas

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — Families canceling vacations. Fishermen watching their profits burn up along with their boats' gasoline. Drivers buying only a few gallons of gas at a time because they can't afford to fill the tank.

    From all corners of the country, Americans are irritated these days by record-high fuel prices that have soared above $4 a gallon in some states and could top $5 by summer. And the cost is becoming a political issue just as the presidential campaign kicks into high gear.

  • Authors talk about water

    Mesa Public Library’s Authors Speak Series presents a talk on one of the most discussed issues in New Mexico and the Southwest: water and in particular, the Rio Grande. This study by three authors in different fields examines the history of the Rio Grande from many angles.
    G. Emlen Hall and Fred Phillips will present, “Authors of Reining in the Rio Grande: People, Land and Water,” at 7 p.m. Thursday in the upstairs rotunda of Mesa Public Library.
    The study examines human interactions with the Rio Grande from prehistoric time to the present day and explores what possibilities remain for the desert river.

  • With pregnancy, comes questions

    Pregnant women get asked many questions as they await their babies: When are you due? Is it a boy or a girl? Have you picked out a name? Have you written a birth plan?
    Or even, sometimes: Who’s the father?
    In “The Snapper,” sort of a 1993 Irish precursor to the 2007 American mega hit “Knocked Up” — in that both comedies star a fetus that does not result from sacred marital love, but rather from booze — 20-year-old Sharon Curley (Tina Kellegher) does not want to answer that last question.