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Today's News

  • Pacino, ‘Scarface’ cast celebrate film’s legacy 


    LOS ANGELES — Al Pacino says he got burned while making “Scarface.”
    Literally, he grabbed the hot barrel of a gun that had just shot 30 rounds during one of Tony Montana’s violent scenes.
    “My hand stuck to that sucker,” the 71-year-old actor recalled. He couldn’t work for two weeks.
    Pacino relayed the experience during a discussion with “Scarface” co-stars Steven Bauer, Robert Loggia and F. Murray Abraham and producer Martin Bregman at a party Tuesday heralding the film’s Blu-ray release.
    Part of the charm of the film, Pacino said, is that it wasn’t initially a hit.

  • Tests show no illegal drugs in Winehouse body 


    LONDON — Amy Winehouse had no illegal drugs in her system when she died, and it is still unclear what killed the singer, her family said Tuesday.
    The family said in a statement that toxicology tests showed “alcohol was present” in the singer’s body but it hasn’t yet been determined if it contributed to her death.
    The 27-year-old soul diva, who had battled drug and alcohol addiction for years, was found dead in her London home on July 23, and an initial post-mortem failed to determine the cause of death.

  • 'Help' moves up with $20.5M

     LOS ANGELES — “The Help” continues to clean up at the box office, taking over the No. 1 spot with $20.5 million in its second weekend.
    The DreamWorks Pictures film starring Viola Davis, Emma Stone and Octavia Spencer in a drama about Southern black maids had debuted in second-place a week earlier. “The Help” raised its domestic total to $71.8 million and bumped 20th Century Fox’s “Rise of the Planet of the Apes,” which slipped to No. 2 with $16.3 million after two weekends at the top, according to studio estimates Sunday.
    “Rise of the Planet of the Apes” remains a solid hit, lifting its domestic total to $133.8 million.

  • Celebrity News 08-25-11

    Author Stephen King offers left-leaning talk show

    BANGOR, Maine — Stephen King is offering an antidote to what he sees as the biases of right-wing radio talk shows by hiring a former Green Party vice presidential candidate to co-host a morning talk show on two stations he owns.
    In a rare public appearance, the horror writer held a news conference Tuesday in Bangor, Maine, at the headquarters of his three-station Zone Radio network.
    “The Pulse Morning Show” will be co-hosted by 50-year-old Pat LaMarche and 43-year-old Don Cookson, a former television reporter. LaMarche ran for vice president as a member of the Green Party in 2004.

  • SFO looks to its roots to secure future 


    ALBUQUERQUE — For more than five decades, the spirit behind the Santa Fe Opera has stemmed from a commitment to commissioning new works and presenting rare productions that had never been seen or heard in the United States.
    Now, with its international reputation and location in the shadow of northern New Mexico’s Sangre de Cristo Mountains, the opera continues to make good on its commitment with two new commissions and an American premiere despite the ongoing economic stranglehold that has brought some of the arts community to its knees.
    General director Charles MacKay says that means visitors to the outdoor venue will be treated to new performances for at least the next four years.

  • 'Spider Woman's Gift' offers insight into Navajo weaving

    During the two years (2006-2008) that the exhibit, “Spider Woman’s (Na ashje’ii ‘Asdzáá) Gift: Navajo Weaving Traditions” was at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, there were numerous requests for a catalogue.
    “Spider Woman’s Gift: Nineteenth Century Diné Textiles” is a response to that interest. Images from the exhibit’s classical Navajo (Diné) weavings illustrate illuminating essays by Joyce Begay-Foss and Marian E. Rodee.

  • A day of fishing for the whole family

    A free family fishing clinic at Fenton Lake is being offered by Pajarito Environmental Education Center,  from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday.  
    The New Mexico Department of Game and Fish fishing skills instructor Ti Piper will teach the clinic. Fishing gear will be provided for those who have never fished or want to try a new type of fishing.
    Participants 12 and older will need to have a fishing license, and the vehicle entry fee to Fenton Lake is $5.
    The fishing clinic is geared toward all skill levels — from beginner to experienced — and will teach different kinds of fishing — bait, lure and fly. At noon there will be special fly-casting lessons.

  • See the Sound

    As a celebration of creativity that crosses boundaries, and in conjunction with the Next Big Idea festival, Mesa Public Library will show Jack Ox’s intermedia painting in the Upstairs Art Gallery. A public reception will be from 4-5:45 p.m. Sept. 17.
    In today’s fluid world, definitions, perceptions and forms of expression are blurring: what is art, what is science, what is music? Or, can they intermingle, creating new forms? Ox has done just that with her vast, segmented painting, a visualization of a musical work by Kurt Schwitters, a groundbreaking artist who worked in multimedia in the 1930s. He is generally acknowledged as the 20th century’s greatest master of collage and installation art.

  • Some folks always seem to land on their feet

    Is the media piling on Jerome Block, Jr. and the Public Regulation Commission? That’s what PRC commissioner Ben Hall says. He notes that in America people are presumed innocent until proven guilty.
    Granted, a day seldom goes by without a new charge against Block making headlines. First I will note that all media are very careful to use words like alleged, charged and faces when talking about accused lawbreakers. It allows company lawyers to sleep better at night.
    There has been one recent exception. For a brief period between jobs, former state public safety chief Darren White was the crime reporter for an Albuquerque television channel.

  • Getting involved matters

    Professionals sometimes make a critical mistake in their careers: they neglect to join their industry associations.
    After investing time and money in a university education or training program, they disregard the value of continued education, advocacy and other assistance that associations provide.
    With so much at stake in these difficult times, why would anyone want to go it alone?
    Associations were created by people who saw the need for banding together to fight for common values and interests affecting their industry.
    While this is still the primary reason most people join, modern associations provide much more than they did in their early days.
    Advocacy. For some, this is the most important service an association provides.