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Today's News

  • Fishing Report 10-07-11

    Anglers!

    Got a fish tale to tell, or some photographic evidence to back it up?

    Then let the Los Alamos Monitor know! Submit your fish stories and photos to lasports@lamonitor.com. Then check out lamonitor.com and see if you made the trophy board!

    Northwest

    Animas River: The flow is 121 cfs. The river continues to fish fair to good for trout using various bead-headed nymphs, spinners and worms.

  • Toppers throttled by Sartans

    The Los Alamos Hilltopper boys soccer team was thumped by the St. Pius X Sartans Thursday afternoon in Albuquerque.
    After taking a 2-0 edge after one half, the Sartans scored three times — twice in a seven-minute span — in the second half to top the Hilltoppers 5-0 at Sartan Field.
    Thursday’s contest was a nondistrict affair between the former district rivals. St. Pius left 2-4A after the 2006 season, never having lost a district game since joining the district in 2000.
    St. Pius got off 15 shots-on-goal to Los Alamos’ three, all of which were scooped up by St. Pius’ Timothy Lang.
    Los Alamos, the defending Class 4A champion, defeated St. Pius in the semifinals of its 2010 state title run.

  • Time to restructure

    As Jerome Block Jr. joins the roster of bad boys and girls forced to leave the state’s Public Regulation Commission, let’s look back and see how we got here.
    In 1996 voters passed a constitutional amendment to combine the State Corporation Commission, whose three members were elected on a statewide basis, and the Public Utility Commission, whose three members were appointed.
    It would be replaced by the Public Regulation Commission, whose five members would be elected by district.
    This super-agency would regulate utilities, phone companies, water and sewer systems, insurance, pipelines, and tow-truck operators.

  • It gets better

    They say death is the great equalizer. We all feel pretty much the same after we die.
    And when a loved one dies, the living all suffer the same pain of loss. And so it was for my friend when Bill died.  
    My friend was inconsolable and there was little anyone could do to ease the torment in his heart. Bill had died of AIDS and Mark was his friend, his life mate, his lover. But not his husband.
    As Tina Turner sang, what’s love got to do with it?
    Mark and Bill had lived together in a loving relationship for more than 20 years (far longer than most heterosexual marriages I know.)  
    The disease that took Bill’s life had been contracted by an infected blood supply, not by infidelity or promiscuity.  

  • Fiery train derailment in Ill. leads to evacuation

    TISKILWA, Ill. (AP) — A freight train loaded with ethanol crashed and exploded Friday, sending up bright orange flames and plumes of smoke that could be seen miles away and forcing the evacuation of a small town in northern Illinois.

    Capt. Steve Haywood of the Ottawa Fire Department said the train's tanker cars were shipping ethanol for Decatur-based corn processor Archer Daniels Midland, and possibly other materials and chemicals, when it crashed and derailed. At least six tanker cars were burning, he said.

    There was no immediate about any injuries. Authorities said evacuees from Tiskilwa, a village of about 800 people about 100 miles west of Chicago, are being taken to a nearby high school.

  • Nobel Peace Prize goes to women's rights activists

    OSLO, Norway (AP) — Africa's first democratically elected female president, a Liberian campaigner against rape and a woman who stood up to Yemen's autocratic regime won the Nobel Peace Prize on Friday in recognition of the importance of women's rights in the spread of global peace.

    The 10 million kronor ($1.5 million) award was split three ways between Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, women's rights activist Leymah Gbowee from the same African country and democracy activist Tawakkul Karman of Yemen — the first Arab woman to win the prize.

  • Unemployment rate stays at 9.1 percent

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Employers added 103,000 jobs in September, a modest burst of hiring after a sluggish summer.

    Nearly half of the gains last month occurred because 45,000 striking Verizon workers returned to their jobs.

    Still, job growth remains too weak to lower the unemployment rate, which stayed at 9.1 percent for the third straight month.

    The Labor Department also revised the previous two months to show that companies hired at a better pace than first estimated.

    Employers have added an average of only 72,000 jobs in the past five months. The economy must create twice as many just to keep up with population growth.

  • Winter Weather Advisory Through Noon Saturday

    The National Weather Service has issued the following advisory for this area:

    THE WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY FOR SNOW IS NOW IN EFFECT UNTIL NOON MDT SATURDAY.

    * SNOW ACCUMULATIONS... SNOWFALL AMOUNTS WILL BE QUITE VARIABLE... BUT GENERALLY ACCUMULATIONS OF ONE TO FOUR INCHES ARE EXPECTED ABOVE 8500 FEET.

    * TIMING... OCCASIONAL LIGHT SNOW WILL LINGER TONIGHT... WITH THE POTENTIAL FOR ACCUMULATION INCREASING LATE FRIDAY MORNING INTO FRIDAY NIGHT. SNOW LEVELS WILL RISE A LITTLE FRIDAY AFTERNOON... WITH ONLY THE HIGHER PEAKS PICKING UP ACCUMULATION. HOWEVER... ADDITIONAL SHOWERS FRIDAY NIGHT AND EARLY SATURDAY MORNING MAY LEAD TO ANOTHER COUPLE OF INCHES OF ACCUMULATION.

    * WINDS... NO SUBSTANTIAL WIND IMPACTS ARE FORESEEN.

  • Semi truck crash closes N.M. 4

    N.M. 4 was open in both directions early this morning at mile marker 49 after a semi-truck rolled over going around a hairpin turn at about 2:30 p.m. Thursday.

    Craig Boyd of Albuquerque was driving an 18-wheel semi truck hauling a number of crushed cars heading eastbound on N.M. 4.

    “On the first hard left turn, the vehicle started having issues,” said Los Alamos police Sgt. Jeremy Duran, who was on the scene. “Right as he got through the apex of the turn, the vehicle landed on its side before it rested.”

    Duran said part of the cab was on the guard rail and he estimated the driver’s door was about five feet from the edge of a cliff.

  • Gerrymandering lives on

    Elbridge Gerry had quite a life. Born on July 17, 1744, in Marblehead, Mass., he died 70 years later in Washington, D.C.
    In the intervening years, Gerry graduated from Harvard University, where he immersed himself in classical studies.
    A decade later, he was serving in the Colonial House of Delegates before going on to become a member of the Continental Congress.
    It would be a dazzling political career that put Elbridge Gerry among that select group of American patriots who signed the Declaration of Independence and later among those who served in the new nation’s First and Second Congresses.
    His final triumph came in 1812, when he was elected vice president of the United States under President James Madison.