Today's News

  • Johnson wins essay contest

    Los Alamos Middle School seventh grader Liam Johnson entered an essay in the nationwide Patriots Pen essay contest. The topic this year was, “Are You Proud of Your Country?” LAMS Language Arts Teacher Jennifer Holmes assisted the VFW in getting entries. A total of 13 entries was received. Johnson’s essay was chosen as the post winner and was sent to the district contest, then to the state contest, at which he placed second.
    Gina Smith of the Los Alamos VFW Ladies Auxiliary, presented Johnson with a check for $350 from the Department of New Mexico of Veterans of Foreign Wars, with an additional $25 from the Los Alamos Ladies Auxiliary.

  • On The Docket 03-28-12

    March 19

    Yvonne Woods, 55, Rio Rancho pleaded no contest in Los Alamos Municipal Court to speeding 53 mph in a 35 mph speed zone. Judge Alan Kirk found Woods guilty and her sentence was deferred for 60 days, pending that she doesn’t received any additional citations as part of a probationary period. She was ordered to pay a court fee of $46.

    Nadiga Balasubramanya, 56, Los Alamos, pleaded guilty in Municipal Court to following too closely, not providing vehicle registration on demand and speeding 16-20 mph over the speed limit. Kirk sentenced her to enroll in defensive driving school and pay a $263 fine, which included court fees.

  • CIP projects sent to administrator

    During earlier CIP Committee meetings, Committee Chair Gary Leikness indicated that the committee’s recommendations would be given to the county administrator and projects would be selected during the budget hearings April 16-18.
    However, this week the approach to be used for the CIP portion of the budget has changed. 
    During the council meeting March 20, County Administrator Harry Burgess recommended that the council hold a special meeting outside of the April budget hearings to discuss specific details of each CIP Phase 2 project that is seeking funds in FY13 or future years.

  • Update 03-28-12

    Code RED

    Los Alamos County will conduct a test of its CodeRED emergency notification system at approximately 2 p.m. Thursday.

    Bulk pickup

    Brush and bulk item collection will take place from 8 a.m. April 2 to 4 p.m. April 6. Items must be out by 8 a.m. April 2 for townsite residents with Monday or Tuesday trash service.

    March on Hunger

    Assets In Action is collecting food for the March on Hunger for local food banks. Those wishing to make donations can leave them at either senior center location, KRSN AM 1490, the Los Alamos Chamber of Commerce or Chamisa Elementary now through the end of the month.

    TV appearance

  • Wildfire season gets underway

    At a news conference Tuesday, Governor Susana Martinez announced that she proclaimed March 25–April 7, as Wildfire Awareness Weeks in New Mexico. She urged residents and visitors to the state to be prepared for wildfires and do their part to prevent human-caused wildfires from starting.
    “Unfortunately, conditions are in place for another difficult fire season,” Martinez said. “I urge all New Mexicans to do their part to be safe and take steps to prevent fires whenever they can. Our firefighters and emergency officials did an incredible job of keeping New Mexicans safe during last year’s devastating fires, but we all have a responsibility to be aware of this year’s fire dangers and the consequences of careless behavior.”

  • NNSA makes progress on PF-4 upgrades

    Periodically, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board in Washington makes a report to Congress.
    The main thrust of the report, released earlier this month, was to discuss the status of significant unresolved issues with the Department of Energy’s design and construction reports.
    On top of the list is the seismic evaluation and upgrade of Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Plutonium Facility and the Hanford Site’s Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. According to the report, these two projects have the most significant unresolved safety issues.
    According to interagency correspondence between the Department of Energy and the National Nuclear Safety Administration have made some headway in resolving some of these issues.

  • Crane towers over LA

    A large crane  has been in operation the past two days at the Municipal Complex building site. The crane was being used to set the steel beams into place when framing of the building began Monday.

  • LA man faces rape charges

    A man accused of raping another man while he was asleep is headed to Los Alamos Magistrate Court to face charges next month.
    Gregory Thompson, 28, Los Alamos, is charged with two counts of criminal sexual penetration, both third degree felonies; attempted criminal sexual penetration, also a third degree felony; and attempted criminal sexual contact, a fourth degree felony.
    He faces 10 1/2 years behind bars and a $20,000 fine if found guilty of all the charges.
    The police report regarding the incident tells the following story: On Feb. 12 at 4:21 a.m., Los Alamos Police Cpl. Christopher Ross responded to a domestic call. Once Ross arrived, the undisclosed caller was pacing around the kitchen and seemed to be upset.

  • Council supports DPU request

    The Los Alamos County Council voted to support the Los Alamos Department of Public Utilities’ request for a resolution supporting a State Implementation Plan for reducing regional haze at PNM’s San Juan Generating Station near Farmington.
    The resolution also requests an administrative stay of enforcement for a more stringent Environmental Protection Agency Federal Implementation Plan, until the issue is decided in court. Without the stay of enforcement, approximately $250 million could be lost implementing the plan, should the courts decide in favor of the SIP.
    Los Alamos County owns a 7.2 percent share of unit 4 at the generating station, which provides approximately 50 percent of the electric requirements for Los Alamos County.

  • Most Town Hall recommendations say general things in general ways

    Nearly 175 New Mexicans and a couple of Texans gathered in Albuquerque recently for the 100th New Mexico First Town Hall, with the topic “Learning from our Past. Planning our future.”
    People from metro Albuquerque and Santa Fe — what I call the north-central urban area and home to half the state’s two million people — dominated the town hall. Of the 163 people listed in the participant packet, 25, or 15 percent, were from outside the north central area. Of those, six came from northeast counties working on a regional economic development approach.
    Two participants from Houston (that’s the one in Texas) must have registered late because they were not listed. The Texans work for energy companies.