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Today's News

  • NM Community Foundation lays groundwork for monitoring group

    The new group does not have a name yet.
    But on Friday, the New Mexico Community Foundation had a transition meeting for what used to be the Community Radiation Monitoring Group at Northern New Mexico College.
    The NMCF will begin hosting ongoing monthly meetings which will focus on broadening community participation and education in topics concerning the Los Alamos National Laboratory’s operations and its environmental monitoring activities.
    NMCF organizers Denise Gonzales and Sarah Wolters outlined four different goals for the new group.

  • Fighting spring fire dangers

    The 66-acre Valle Canyon Fire burning approximately 1.5 miles south of Pajarito Ski Mountain and just three miles west of Los Alamos since Thursday night along with the March 7 Quail Ridge Fire that destroyed 20 homes in Silver City are fresh reminders that spring can be a dangerous fire season.

    “In April, if we don’t get rain, we’re basically sitting ducks,” said Los Alamos Assistant Fire Chief/Fire Marshal Michael Thompson.

    As a precaution, the U.S. Forest Service is bringing in a special helicopter equipped for aerial firefighting.

  • Obama says coalition prepared to act in Libya

    BRASILIA, Brazil (AP) — With American military forces poised for action, President Barack Obama said Saturday that the United States and its allies are prepared to act with urgency to end violence against civilians in Libya.

    The president spoke as French warplanes began the first sorties to enforce a no-fly zone over Libya, where Moammar Gadhafi's bloody attacks on rebels continued.

  • US pounds Libyan air defenses, assesses damage--see videos

  • Egyptians vote in major test of shift to democracy

    CAIRO (AP) — Eager for their first taste of a free vote in decades, Egyptians lined up by the hundreds Saturday to vote on constitutional amendments sponsored by the ruling military that critics fear could propel the country's largest Islamist group to become Egypt's most dominant political force.

    The nationwide referendum is the first major test of the country's transition to democracy after a popular uprising forced longtime leader Hosni Mubarak to step down five weeks ago, handing the reins of power to the military.

  • Former Secretary of State Warren Christopher dies

    When he took over as secretary of state in the Clinton administration at age 68, Warren M. Christopher said he didn't expect to travel much. He went on to set a four-year mark for miles traveled by America's top diplomat.

    The attorney turned envoy tirelessly traveled to Bosnia and the Middle East on peace missions during his 1993-1996 tenure — including some two dozen to Syria alone in a futile effort to promote a settlement with Israel.

  • Japan officials: radioactive iodine in Tokyo water

    TOKYO (AP) — The Japanese government reports that trace amounts of radioactive iodine were detected in tap water in Tokyo and five other areas, amid concerns about leaks from a damaged nuclear power plant.

    A government ministry reported Saturday that small amounts of the iodine was found in tap water in Tokyo and five other prefectures. The ministry says the amounts did not exceed government safety limits but usual tests show no iodine.

  • Hamas fires dozens of rockets at Israel

    JERUSALEM (AP) — Palestinian militants in Gaza fired more than 50 rockets into Israel on Saturday, the heaviest barrage in two years, Israeli officials said.

    A Hamas official was killed and four civilians were wounded when Israel hit back with tank fire and air strikes, said Gaza Health Ministry spokesman Adham Abu Salmia.

  • Japan cites radiation in milk, spinach near plant--video included

    FUKUSHIMA, Japan (AP) — Japan said radiation levels in spinach and milk from farms near its tsunami-crippled nuclear complex exceeded government safety limits, as emergency teams scrambled Saturday to restore power to the plant so it could cool dangerously overheated fuel.

    The food was taken from farms as far as 65 miles (100 kilometers) from the stricken plants, suggesting a wide area of nuclear contamination.

  • Scientists lack complete answers on radiation risk

    Thyroid cancer for sure. Leukemia, probably. Too much radiation can raise the risk of developing cancer years down the road, scientists agree, and the young are most vulnerable. But just how much or how long an exposure is risky is not clear.

    Those are among the unknowns scientists are contemplating as the crisis unfolds at Japan's stricken nuclear power plant.