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Today's News

  • PEEC unveils Earth Day plans

    New Mexico became a state 100 years ago, January 6, 1912, after 60 years as a Territory. In those 100 years and before, the land that encompasses the Jemez Mountains and Pajarito Plateau has undergone many changes from open and lightly inhabited  lands, to grazing land for thousands of livestock, to population development and urbanization. But even without these changes, the ecosystem is constantly changing in response to both natural and human impacts.  

  • Costner: Houston the Only One for 'Bodyguard'

    Actor Kevin Costner, who picked Whitney Houston for the 1992 movie, "The Bodyguard" spoke at her funeral in Newark, New Jersey, saying she was the only one who could have filled her role.

  • Update 02-19-12

    GOP convention

    The Los Alamos Republicans will hold their pre-primary convention Feb. 23 at the VFW, 1793 Deacon St. Registration begins at 6:30 p.m. and doors close promptly at 7 p.m.   A Central Committee meeting will be at 7 p.m.
     
    Little League

    Los Alamos Little League will host a planning meeting at 6 p.m. Feb. 21 at Mesa Public Library. The meeting is for anyone interested in coaching or volunteering during the 2012 season.

    LA Garden Club

  • Local doctor returns from Kuwait deployment

    Paul Daly, a Family Practice physician with Medical Associates of Northern New Mexico, recently returned from his fourth mobilization as an Army Reserve medical officer. During this deployment,  Daly was assigned to the 310th Expeditionary Sustainment Command (ESC) Brigade as its command surgeon.

    The 310th ESC is based out of Indianapolis, but draws soldiers from several neighboring states. The function of an ESC is to provide combat services support.

  • Luján reacts to conclusions from NRC

    Congressman Ben Ray Luján of New Mexico’s Third District weighed in on a new report by the National Research Council (NRC) that examines the long-term scientific and engineering vitality at the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) laboratories, including Los Alamos and Sandia.
    The report recommended broadening the labs’ mission and moving to a governance model based more on trust and less on transactional oversight.
    “The scientific and engineering vitality of these labs has always been and will continue to be one of their most important assets,” Luján said.

  • No good vibes at Municipal site

    Residents living near the construction site of the new municipal building no doubt know the pad has been completed for the new county complex. The soil compaction that has raised concerns for area homeowners is nearly complete.

    Some further compaction is needed to complete work on Iris Street and the parking area, but Capital Projects Manager Dan Erickson hopes that leg of the project is less intense. The same compactor will be used for a portion of that work, but Erickson said that the contractor, Jaynes Corporation, may utilize smaller equipment as well.

  • Fallout continues from CMRR: Legislative decision leaves more questions than answers in Los Alamos

    It’s been a long week for those involved with the Chemistry Metallurgy Research Replacement facility.

    And the extent of the fallout remains uncertain.

    Lab director Charlie McMillan has scheduled an all-hands meeting for LANL employees Tuesday to discuss the CMRR project, which was deferred for five years after the funding was yanked in the President’s FY13 budget request.

    The Los Alamos Chamber of Commerce has become involved in an attempt to figure out the impact on several businesses and subcontractors.

  • Fallout continues from CMRR: Protesting and lobbying helped turn the tide in Washington

    Depending on how one looks at it, the activists can take credit and/or the blame for the decision that will defer construction of the Chemistry Metallurgy Research Replacement.

    On Monday, the President’s FY 13 budget zeroed out funding for the project.

    Throughout the process critics showed up in force at the various public comment meetings throughout the state.

    With the exception of the Los Alamos meeting, at least 40 to 50 people spoke out against the project.

    And a lot of those same people headed to Washington to lobby Congress.

    Greg Mello of the Los Alamos Study Group has been to Washington three times and also New York once this year.

  • Word on the Street 02-19-12

    Teen Pulse staff member and Los Alamos High School senior Ada Ciuca asked LAHS students, “If you could elect anyone for president, who would it be and why?”

  • Doors’ reissue delivers nothing but empty promises

    According to legend, starving artists such as Jimi Hendrix, Jim Morrison and Janis Joplin sold their souls to the devil in exchange for riches and fame.
    Each of these artists died at age 27, at the height of their careers, which adds to the myth.
    The fact that the trio — and other artists like Amy Winehouse and Kurt Cobain — all died at 27, after achieving fame has added to the legend, which has become known as the “27 Club.”
    Morrison was arguably the most controversial of 1960s artists. His band, The Doors, rose to fame in the late 60s and in their short four years together, left a trail of devastation wherever they went.