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Today's News

  • Shroyer wins at international art competition

    Charlotte “Charlee” Shroyer, one of the artists in “Art: Dewey Decimal,” at Fuller Lodge, has been named a first place winner in the 2011 Top Ten International Women in the Arts competition, sponsored by ARTROM Gallery, Rome, Italy.
    Artists from more than 20 countries participated in this competition honoring the creative energy of women.
    Long fascinated by Cistercian abbeys and medieval architecture of Europe, Shroyer paints women of the ages. Often with animals at their sides, these paintings are much more than just female figures — they tell stories of women’s historical and emotional passages through time.  

  • Meet Gronk at the Santa Fe Opera

    It is unusual to have an artist paint a complete set for an opera, but that is exactly what Los Angeles Chicano artist Gronk is doing during the month of April.  He is in residence in the Opera’s Stieren Hall, creating the visuals for this summer’s production of Vivaldi’s “Griselda.”  
    As director Peter Sellars explains, “I don’t know what he is going to do, I have not told him anything.  When an artist paints, he creates a special environment in which the singers will perform.”  Gronk prepared the set for the 2005 production of Golijov’s “Ainadamar,” covering the walls and the floor with his singular perspective on the opera.

  • Meet Gronk at the Santa Fe Opera

    It is unusual to have an artist paint a complete set for an opera, but that is exactly what Los Angeles Chicano artist Gronk is doing during the month of April.  He is in residence in the Opera’s Stieren Hall, creating the visuals for this summer’s production of Vivaldi’s “Griselda.”  
    As director Peter Sellars explains, “I don’t know what he is going to do, I have not told him anything.  When an artist paints, he creates a special environment in which the singers will perform.”  Gronk prepared the set for the 2005 production of Golijov’s “Ainadamar,” covering the walls and the floor with his singular perspective on the opera.

  • 'Art: Dewey Decimal'

    Interests are often as diverse and as unique as the individual.  Regardless of where one’s interests lie, the library usually has something for everyone, and this month, the Fuller Lodge Art Center serves as a visual library just waiting to be perused, as the newest exhibition, “Art: Dewey Decimaled,” makes its debut with an opening from 5-7 p.m. Friday.

  • An afternoon in Andalusia

    The Pajarito Spanish Dance Alliance will present its first recital of Flamenco and Spanish Dance at 3 p.m. April 16 in the Pajarito Room at Fuller Lodge.  
    The company is directed by Ellen Walton and includes students and professional artists from Los Alamos, Taos, Santa Fe, Dixon and La Jara.   
    Arturo Montoya, Kevin Rendón and Robert Romero will be on guitar. Dancers Catalina Rio Fernandez, Mary Woolston and Ellen Walton will join students Emily Brown, Bob Davis, Chris Jeffrey, Donna Martin, Opale Schappert, Annie Smith and Diane Trujillo in a variety of both, traditional Flamenco and classical Spanish dances.  

  • Artist reinvents himself

    Karen Wray Fine Art Gallery will have a reception for its exhibit, “Old West, New West,” featuring the works of local artists Tim Althauser, Danne DeBacker, Cindy Valdez, Connie Pacheco and Kathy Hjeresen, from 5-7 p.m. April 29.
    “It feels like I’ve won the lottery every time I sell a painting … and now it’s happening more and more often,” said Nambé painter, Tim Althauser.
    He recently sold a painting to a collector in Dallas and a big painting to another collector in San Francisco. He has 10 paintings in the Downey Gallery on Canyon Road in Santa Fe, and he may have already sold the half-finished painting on his easel.

  • Gov. Martinez signs bill prohibiting corporal punishment in NM schools

    CARLSBAD – Gov. Susana Martinez recently announced she signed House Bill 172, legislation that prohibits corporal punishment in New Mexico’s schools.
    “The decision on whether or not to use corporal punishment on a child is one that is best left to a parent,” Martinez said.
    Corporal punishment was already banned in 53 of New Mexico’s 89 school districts. According to the most recent data by the U.S. Department of Education, there were 705 incidents of corporal punishment in New Mexico during the 2006 school year, which represents 0.2 percent of the state’s students.
    New Mexico now joins 30 other states that do not permit corporal punishment        in schools.

  • Gunman opens fire in Brazilian school, 12 dead--see videos

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — A gunman opened fire at a public elementary school in Rio de Janeiro on Thursday, killing at least 11 students before taking his own life.

    At least 18 other people, mostly students, were hurt and brought to local hospitals, said Rio state Health Secretary Sergio Cortes. At least four were in grave condition.

    The dead included 10 girls and one boy, plus the gunman, Cortes said. The ages of the children were not immediately known. Police had said earlier that at least 13 people had died in the shooting.

  • Another strong quake rattles tsunami-ravaged Japan--video extra

    SENDAI, Japan (AP) — A big aftershock rocked quake-weary Japan late Thursday, rattling nerves as it knocked out power to the northern part of the country and prompted tsunami warnings that were later canceled.

    The quake was initially measured at magnitude-7.4, though the U.S. Geological Survey in Golden, Colo., later downgraded it to 7.1. Either way, it was the strongest aftershock since several were recorded on March 11 — the day of the magnitude-9.0 earthquake and tsunami that killed as many as 25,000 people and touched off a nuclear crisis last month.

  • Libyan rebels say NATO airstrikes hit their forces

    AJDABIYA, Libya (AP) — Rebel fighters claimed NATO airstrikes blasted their forces Thursday in another apparent mistake that sharply escalated anger about coordination with the military alliance in efforts to cripple Libyan forces. At least two rebels were killed and more than a dozen injured, a doctor said.

    The attack — near the front lines outside the eastern oil port of Brega — would be the second accidental NATO strike against rebel forces in less than a week and brought cries of outrage from fighters struggling against Moammar Gadhafi's larger and more experienced military.

    "Down, down with NATO," shouted one fighter as dozens of rebel vehicles raced eastward from the front toward the rebel-held city of Ajbadiya.