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Today's News

  • Boys soccer: LA falls to Eldorado at home, 2-0

    The Eldorado Eagles scored twice in the first half Thursday to down the Los Alamos Hilltopper boys soccer team.

    Los Alamos hosted Class 5A Eldorado Thursday, just two days after opening its District 2-4A season with a win over Bernalillo.

    The loss dropped the Hilltoppers to 5-8 on the season. They have lost five of their last six contests.

    Los Alamos continues its district season Saturday with a contest at Santa Fe. Los Alamos is still considered the team to beat in district this season and finished as the third-ranked team in Class 4A in this week's coaches' poll, tied with St. Pius X.

  • Golf: LA girls second at Bernalillo Invite

    The Los Alamos Hillltopper girls golf team shaved 33 strokes off its total earlier this week at Thursday's Bernalillo Invitational.

    Emma Stearns broke 100 at the invitational, held at Cochiti Golf Course Thursday. Stearns and Aislinn McDonald both finished with 97s to lead the Hilltopper girls, who finished in the runner-up spot behind Cleveland High School for the second time in as many tournaments.

    In boys competition, Los Aamos finished with 386 strokes, three shots better than its performance at Monday's Los Alamos Invitational. Raul Roybal led the way with an 86.

  • LA drops Eldorado in OT, 2-1

    The Los Alamos Hilltopper girls soccer team came back from a 1-0 first half deficit to pick up a 2-1 shootout victory Friday.

    Los Alamos bounced back from a less-than-stellar first half to tie the contest in the second half. Then, after a back-and-forth overtime period, Bryce Theesfeld stopped an Eldorado penalty kick, while the Eagles missed two more in a row.

    Hilltoppers Cassidy Reeves and Amy Neal converted the final two penalty kick attempts to earn the Hilltoppers their fourth win of the season either in shootout or in overtime.

  • Physicists wary of junking light speed limit yet

    GENEVA (AP) — Physicists on the team that measured particles traveling faster than light said Friday they were as surprised as their skeptics about the results, which appear to violate the laws of nature as we know them.

    Hundreds of scientists packed an auditorium at one of the world's foremost laboratories on the Swiss-French border to hear how a subatomic particle, the neutrino, was found to have outrun light and confounded the theories of Albert Einstein.

    "To our great surprise we found an anomaly," said Antonio Ereditato, who participated in the experiment and speaks on behalf of the team.

    An anomaly is a mild way of putting it.

  • US stock futures fall as global rout continues

    U.S. stock futures dropped Friday as spreading recession fears power a global sell-off in all investments that carry risk.

    Markets in Asia closed sharply lower. The broad STOXX 50 index of European shares was down 1 percent. U.S. markets have fallen for four straight sessions, driving the Standard & Poor's 500 index down more than 7 percent this week.

    Treasury yields remain near record lows as traders amass lower-risk bets. Demand for Treasurys drives their prices higher and their yields lower.

    At 8:40 a.m. Eastern time, S&P 500 futures fell 14, or 1.3 percent, to 1,109. Dow Jones industrial average futures lost 120, or 1.1 percent, to 10,530. Nasdaq 100 futures slid 26, or 1.2 percent, to 2,149.

  • LANL Finishes Excavation of 1940s Waste Dump on DP Road

    Los Alamos National Laboratory on Thursday announced that it has completed excavation of its oldest waste disposal site, Material Disposal Area B (MDA-B).

    The excavation removed about 43,000 cubic yards of contaminated debris and soil from the six-acre site. MDA-B was used from 1944-48 as a waste disposal site for Manhattan Project and Cold War-era research and production.

    The environmental cleanup worked was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

  • Some economic good news

    Years of writing negative things about the New Mexico economy have gotten tedious.
    Maybe I’m hallucinating, but I see a few items suggesting some economic green shoots.
    I’m sure that our eventual recovery will resemble my tomatoes this year — small and slow. That’s because we’ve been so far down so long and because the creaky national economy is our biggest economic driver.
    State jobs figures, due today, could place all my optimism in the delusion file. (Seewww.dws.state.nm.us .)
    Still … Some people want to be optimistic about the reported Albuquerque appearance, set for next year, of Dick’s Sporting Goods, the nation’s largest such firm.

  • Composting conundrum in Los Alamos County

    It’s just a hunch, but I bet everyone reading this column has driven by the intersection of East Jemez Road and West Jemez Road and caught a whiff of the county’s composting operation.  
    Depending on the day, and your past olfactory experiences, you may find the smell to be an assault on your nostrils.  
    Personally, I think it is a pleasant earthy scent that symbolizes the transformation of waste into a valued commodity. But, that seems to be a minority view.  
    The Los Alamos County Council and public in general have made it clear that the creation of a sustainable community is important, and composting is one initiative that greatly increases the sustainability of our community.  

  • Seen at the Scene: At the Roundhouse

    A contingent from Los Alamos made the trip to Santa Fe to meet with Gov. Susana Martinez regarding redistricting. Making the trip were Council Chair Sharon Stover, school board member Kevin Honnell, Bill Enloe of Los Alamos National Bank, Katy Korkos of the Chamber of Commerce, Mike Wheeler of the Los Alamos Democratic Party, Don Lucero, and Veronica Rodriguez of the Los Alamos Republican Party.

  • WIPP manager to trim jobs

    CARLSBAD — The manager of the federal government’s nuclear waste repository in southeastern New Mexico plans to trim more jobs.
    Washington TRU Solutions on Monday announced the second phase of a workforce restructuring plan at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant near Carlsbad.
    Earlier this year, 51 of the company’s workers volunteered to leave as part of the first phase. The company expects about 65 workers, including temporary staff, to be involved in the second round of cuts.
    Subcontract personnel are also expected to be affected.
    Washington TRU Solutions pointed to the end of federal stimulus funding Sept. 30 and projections that peg WIPP’s budget next year at the lowest level in eight years.