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Today's News

  • Just A Wag 09-30-11

    Facing one’s fifth decade with grace

    Rumor has it that a certain director of a local organization has come to the end of her 40s on Thursday — turning old enough to join her very own program.

    Send us your wags

    “Just a wag” features initial snippets of news heard around town. 
    The wags may grow to larger stories or simply remain snippets, either way this is meant to spark interest and provide food for thought.
    E-mail wags to lanews@lamonitor.com.

  • Breeding better wheat

    I spent this past summer trudging through six-mile treks each weekend with two good friends.
    We walked along the edge of wheat fields outside of town.
    My friends and I qualify as middle-aged ladies, so the walks counted as significant exercise — sad but true.
    One of the interesting things about the walks was simply observing the growth and ripening of the wheat fields by which we passed.
    We depend on wheat for bread, pasta, animal feed, noodles and perhaps most importantly — fresh-baked cinnamon rolls.
    Watching a whole field of wheat grow up, turn from green to gold, and finally be harvested is a magical production that never grows old, at least for us hayseeds.

  • John Pawlak: It does make you think

    I’ve always liked miracles. They come in so many different sizes and flavors, you get to take your choice of favorites from a virtual warehouse ranging from the surprising to the truly ridiculous.  
    And of course, knowing me, it shouldn’t be a surprise that I’m not particularly interested in writing about the surprising. And so let’s get ridiculous!
    First of all, we should wash away any criticism of miracles and admit that we all like them. Miracles are a staple of life. There’s Miracle Whip (it’s a miracle if you can figure out what this stuff is.)

  • Phoenix Running

    Hilltoppers Miranda Barraza (foreground) and Janali Gustafson head to the finish line of the Albuquerque Academy Invitational last week.

    Los Alamos’ boys and girls are competing in the Twilight Festival meet in Phoenix tonight. The meet takes place on the same course as the Nike Cross Nationals regional meet. Several top regional teams are expected to compete at tonight’s race.

  • Marr wins Pace Race

    Jackie Marr had a spotless prediction at this week’s Atomic City Roadrunners’ Pace Race.
    The Atomic City Roadrunners’ Pace Race was Tuesday in Pajarito Acres, run on paved roads.
    Marr, running on the 1-mile course, just beat out Karen Thorn, who was only off her predicted time by two seconds on the 2.8-mile course, and David Kratzer, who was just 10 seconds off.
    On the long course, Jamie Jablin finished in a time of 18 minutes, 11 seconds. Laura McClellan was the fastest female finisher on the long course with her time of 20:49.
    On the 1-mile course, Hannah and Norald Gartz tied for the fastest finish, both coming in at 9:16.
    The next Pace Race is 6 p.m. Tuesday at the Canyon Rim Trail. For more information, call 672-1639.

  • Results from Senior Men's championship

    Here are the results from the Northern New Mexico Senior Men’s Golf Association championship tournament, held Tuesday and Wednesday at Sandia Golf Club in Albuquerque.

    Overall low gross
    Rob Schneider, Santa Fe, 156.

    Overall low net
    Phil Allen, Gallup, 130.

    Championship flight

    First low gross
    Bob Sherman, Santa Fe, 157.

    Second low gross
    Dean Boice, Alamosa, Colo., 161.

    First low net
    Larry Minarsich, Bernalillo, 144.

    First flight

    First low gross
    Jerry McKee, Pagosa Springs, Colo., 164.

    Second low gross
    Robert Frank, Santa Fe, 166.

    First low net

  • Paramedics up next in trial of Jackson's doctor

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — Paramedics who responded to Michael Jackson's mansion the day he died were expected to testify Friday in the trial of the pop star's doctor who has been charged with involuntary manslaughter.

    Martin Blount and Richard Senneff had previously testified at a preliminary hearing that Dr. Conrad Murray never mentioned giving Jackson the powerful anesthetic propofol and told them the singer lost consciousness moments before an ambulance was called. Both men believed the singer had died by the time they arrived in June 2009, but Murray insisted the performer be taken to a hospital for more resuscitation efforts.

  • Fear in Colo. town at heart of Listeria outbreak

    HOLLY, Colo. (AP) — Eric Jensen surveys his dusty cantaloupe field and seems equally stunned and puzzled at the fate that has befallen his crop: row upon row of melons rotting on the vine.

    Jensen is the co-owner of the Colorado farm where health officials say a national listeria outbreak originated, making his withering fields the epicenter of a food scare that has sickened dozens of people from Wyoming to Maryland and caused 16 deaths.

    Jensen has no idea how his cantaloupes became infected, and neither do the Food and Drug Administration investigators who have intermittently been in this town of 800 people near the Kansas border since the outbreak started earlier this month.

  • Yemen says al-Qaida-linked cleric Awlaki killed--video extra

    SANAA, Yemen (AP) — In a significant new blow to al-Qaida, U.S. airstrikes in Yemen on Friday killed Anwar al-Awlaki, an American born in New Mexico and a militant cleric who became a prominent figure in the terror network's most dangerous branch, using his fluent English and Internet savvy to draw recruits for attacks in the United States.

    The strike was the biggest U.S. success in hitting al-Qaida's leadership since the May killing of Osama bin Laden in Pakistan. But it raises questions that other strikes did not: Al-Awlaki was an American citizen who has not been charged with any crime. Civil liberties groups have questioned the government's authority to kill an American without trial.

  • Killer cantaloupe, scary sprouts _ what to do?

    MILWAUKEE (AP) — Avoid foreign produce. Wash and peel your fruit. Keep it refrigerated. None of these common tips would have guaranteed your safety from the deadliest food outbreak in a decade, the one involving cantaloupes from Colorado.

    Whether it's sprouts or spinach, turkey or hamburger; whether the government doubled, tripled or quadrupled inspections, the truth is that no food will ever be completely free of risk.

    And a few foods have become so risky that certain people such as children, pregnant women and the elderly may do best to avoid them altogether until growers and the government figure out how to make them safer, some food experts say.