Today's News

  • PAYT is harmful and inequitable

    In the Nov. 3 Los Alamos Monitor, there is a View Point discussing claimed environmental benefits for the “Pay-As-You-Throw” (PAYT) rate structure for trash pickup.
    Contrary to the conclusion of that writer, the PAYT system is an environmentally harmful system and is also inequitable for the following reasons:

  • Calling loudly for change

    It’s no coincidence that the big banks backed away from new debit card fees.
    The Occupy Wall Street protesters are just one manifestation of broad discontent.
    The Occupy phenomenon is fascinating on several levels.
    Journalists write every day about wrongs and injustice, hoping that somebody will care enough (or be embarrassed enough by the glare of publicity) to do something.
    We’ve seen the poor catalogued in increasing numbers, and we know food banks and nonprofits are scrambling to care for them.
    We also know – and Warren Buffett confirms – that the wealthy get a pretty good shake, taxwise.

  • LA will take on Moriarty, Gallup in pool play round

    It might be a good thing for the Los Alamos Hilltopper volleyball team that clocks were turned back an hour this weekend.
    The Hilltoppers will have to play bright and early Thursday to start the Class 4A playoffs.
    Los Alamos and the rest of the Class 4A field will open the state tournament at 8 a.m. Thursday. The tournament is set for the Santa Ana Star Center in Rio Rancho.
    As expected, the Hilltoppers earned the No. 3 overall seed in pool play. They are the top seed in Pool C, which also includes sixth-seeded Moriarty and 11th-seeded Gallup.
    Los Alamos will play Gallup at 8 a.m. Thursday in its first pool play contest, then, after Moriarty and Gallup face off, Los Alamos will take on Moriarty’s Pintos.

  • LA saddled with No. 12 seed, will play Los Lunas on Friday

    While it appeared in the final weeks of the regular season the Los Alamos Hilltopper football team made a case why it should not be the No. 12 seed in the state Class 4A tournament, the seeding and selection committee didn’t agree.
    Los Alamos picked up the 12th and final seed for the Class 4A playoffs, which get going this weekend with four games. Los Alamos will face fifth-seeded Los Lunas Friday night on the road.
    The Hilltoppers were relegated to the bottom of the 4A bracket, the same way the Bernalillo Spartans were a year earlier. While based on early season play, a No. 12 seed wasn’t unjustifiable for the Hilltoppers, the team pulled things together at the end of the season, considerably better than did the Spartans a year ago.

  • NM biofuels projects gets loan guarantee

    COLUMBUS, N.M. (AP) — The federal government is issuing a loan guarantee to a company that plans to build a $135 million plant in southern New Mexico to produce biofuel from algae.

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture announced the guarantee Monday. It has been in the making since December 2009, when the agency first issued a conditional commitment for an 80 percent guarantee on a $54.5 million loan.

    The financing will help Sapphire Energy, Inc., build and operate an integrated algal biorefinery in Columbus. Federal officials say it's all part of an effort to provide renewable commercial-scale biofuels.

  • Boxing great Joe Frazier dies after cancer fight--video extra

    PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Joe Frazier needed the night of his career to knock down "The Greatest."

    Frazier knocked Muhammad Ali down in the 15th round and became the first man to beat him in the Fight of the Century at Madison Square Garden in March 1971, the first in a trilogy of bouts that have gone down as boxing's most fabled fights.

    "That was the greatest thing that ever happened in my life," Frazier said.

    It was his biggest night, one that would never come again.

    The relentless, undersized heavyweight ruled the division as champion, then spent a lifetime trying to fight his way out of Ali's shadow.

  • NM governor chooses Santa Fe consultant for PRC

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — Gov. Susana Martinez on Monday picked Santa Fe consultant Doug Howe to fill the position left vacant by the resignation of embattled former Public Regulation Commissioner Jerome Block Jr.

    Martinez described Howe as being well-versed in energy, environmental and regulatory issues.

    "Northern and Central New Mexicans deserve a commissioner who is competent, trustworthy and focused on the numerous issues in front of the PRC," the governor said in a statement. "... I am confident that he is the right pick to serve on the PRC and will approach his position thoughtfully and professionally."

  • Jackson doctor convicted in star's 2009 drug death--video extra

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — A jury has convicted Michael Jackson's doctor of involuntary manslaughter in the singer's 2009 drug death.

    The jury reached its verdict Monday after deliberating less than nine hours. Prosecutors depicted Dr. Conrad Murray as a reckless physician who abandoned Jackson while he was under the effects of the powerful anesthetic propofol.

    Attorneys for the Houston-based cardiologist countered that Jackson was addicted to the drug and self-administered the fatal dose when Murray left his bedroom.

    Murray agreed to become Jackson's personal physician as the singer prepared for a series of comeback concerts in 2009.

  • Poverty rate hits new all-time high

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The ranks of America's poor are greater than previously known, reaching a new level of 49.1 million — or 16 percent — due to rising medical costs and other expenses that make it harder for people to stay afloat, according to new census estimates.

    The numbers released Monday are part of a first-ever supplemental poverty measure aimed at providing a fuller picture of poverty. It is considered experimental and does not replace the Census Bureau's official poverty formula, which continues to determine eligibility and distribution of billions of dollars in federal aid for the poor.

  • Pakistan trains 8,000 to protect nuclear arsenal

    ISLAMABAD (AP) — Pakistan is training 8,000 additional people to protect the country's nuclear arsenal, which the U.S. fears could be vulnerable to penetration by Islamist militants at war with the West, the Pakistani military said.

    Those fears were heightened by a recent U.S. magazine article that quoted unnamed Pakistani and American officials as saying Pakistan transports nuclear weapons components around the country in delivery vans with little security to avoid detection — a claim denied by Islamabad.