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Today's News

  • LA takes on rival St. Pius X

    Not only will the Los Alamos Hilltopper softball team be hosting a game in the first round of the Class 4A state playoffs, that game will be a good ol’ fashioned grudge match.
    The Hilltoppers will meet up with an old foe, the St. Pius X Sartans, to open the 4A playoffs. The winner of the opening round single-elimination games will advance to double-elimination play next week in Albuquerque.
    This will be the second time in three seasons the Hilltoppers will face the Sartans in the tournament opener. The Sartans tripped up the Hilltoppers 4-1 in the 2010 tournament in Las Cruces.
    Los Alamos manager Roger Anaya said that was a game his team had chances to win, but simply couldn’t find the key hits when it needed them.

  • LA's No. 1 doubles team, Townsley take third

    ALBUQUERQUE – The Los Alamos Hilltopper tennis teams earned two third-place finishes and a fourth-place finish at the 2012 state Class 4A individual championships Thursday.
    Los Alamos’ top doubles team of Gillian Hsieh-Ratliff/Madeline Margevicius held off teammates Colleen Fitzsimmons/Susanna Lucido in the third-place match of the girls doubles draw, while Hilltopper Stephen Townsley dropped Albuquerque Academy’s Alex Dunning in their match to claim third place.
    Hsieh-Ratliff/Margevicius nearly pulled off a stunning comeback against MacKenzie Pavlik/Shayla Baysinger of Farmington in the semifinals after dropping the first set and going down in the second set.

  • US hiring slows sharply with just 115K jobs added

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The unemployment rate dropped to 8.1 percent last month from 8.2 percent in March. It has fallen a full percentage point since August to a three-year low. But last month's decline was not due to job growth. The government only counts people as unemployed if they are actively looking for work.

  • VIDEO: Today in History for May 4th
  • VIDEO: WWII Veterans Receive France's Highest Honor

    France bestowed its highest honor Thursday upon 23 men who fought World War II's most epic battles and liberated concentration camps, its latest effort to recognize the dwindling number of surviving veterans of their era.

  • VIDEO: Neurologist Describes Football Brain Hazards

    In the wake of the suicide of football player Junior Seau, some have wondered if he suffered from depression. Neurologist Walter Bradley discusses the potential damage football does to the brain.

  • VIDEO: Bin Laden Documents show al-Qaida in Disarray
  • Be There 05--03-12

    Today
    Mesa Public Library Free Film Series presents, “Chungking Express,” at 6:30 p.m.

    “J. Robert Oppenheimer: Photographs from his life, 1904-1967,” will open with a reception from 4:30-6:30 p.m. in the upstairs art gallery at Mesa Public Library.

    Friday
     Come to PEEC for First Friday Forts. Build forts with other kids in PEEC’s Nature Play Area or in the canyon from 3:30-5 p.m. Free, but parents must stay with their children. For more information, visit PajaritoEEC.org, call 662-0460 or email Programs@PajaritoEEC.org.

  • Spring Arts and Crafts festival slated for Saturday

    An opportunity to enjoy the spring season is approaching. From 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday on the Fuller Lodge lawn, the public can enjoy the sun, fresh air and the plethora of art available through the Los Alamos Arts Council’s 45th Annual Spring Arts and Crafts Fair.
    The Los Alamos Arts Council has presented the fair every year since 1967. Featuring nearly 100 New Mexico artisans, the arts and crafts fair offers both traditional and contemporary art forms. All of the items displayed are hand made or handcrafted. Participants can enjoy items such as pottery, weavings, clothing, woodworking, jewelry and more.  

  • Wright to sign book Friday

    Barbara Wright, author of the critically acclaimed novel for middle readers, “Crow,” will sign her book at 5:30 p.m. Friday at Otowi Station Bookstore. She will visit Mountain and Barranca Elementary Schools and Los Alamos Middle School earlier that day.
    The novel and its cast present a take on race relations, injustice and a little-known chapter in American history, the race riots of 1898 in Wilmington, N.C., through the eyes of the 11-year-old narrator, Moses.