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Today's News

  • We’re safer post 9/11

    All of us who are old enough remember exactly where we were on Sept. 11, 2001, at the moment we first learned that terrorists had taken control of commercial jetliners and crashed them into the World Trade Center in Manhattan, the Pentagon, and a field in Shanksville, Pa.
    On that day, our lives, our country, and our world fundamentally changed.
    Today, a decade later, we remember the loss of the nearly 3,000 innocent victims of the attacks, honor the firefighters, police, and many other first responders, who showed such courage and conviction on that tragic day, and take stock of the fundamental changes that have reshaped our country and improved security for all Americans.

  • Dancing with death

    Once I had a case of influenza so bad I missed close to a month of graduate school.  I ran a fever and coughed until it felt like my whole world was turned upside down.
    Because I’m a geologist, not a medical doctor, I nicknamed that bout of illness “the plague.”  But what I experienced was a walk in the park compared to the real McCoy.
    The sheer virulent power of plague is a tale of human history that’s a warning ringing across the centuries. But the story takes its most interesting turn recently, as science has been unraveling more and more mysteries of the Black Death.
    The first widespread outbreak of the plague we know about started in 541 A.D.  

  • Recounting 9/11 at Pentagon

    Ike Richardson has been at the Los Alamos National Laboratory as deputy director since 2009.
    But before coming to LANL, Richardson spent 31 years of his life in the U.S. Navy, where he attained the rank of Rear Admiral.

    Back in 2001, he had just completed a tour on the USS Nimitz, a nuclear-powered aircraft carrier and he was starting his new job at the Pentagon at the beginning of September.

    He and his wife Donna had just moved to the Washington area and they were staying in a hotel in Crystal City, Va., within walking distance of the Pentagon.

    Sept. 11 started like any other morning for Richardson. He was in his office on the fourth floor early for a staff meeting.

  • The New Solitary Face of Terrorism

    After Sept. 11, 2001, it was the men who went to radicalized mosques or terror boot camps who were perceived as the biggest threat to society. Today, authorities are increasingly focusing on the solitary person living right next door – someone who may have been radicalized on the Internet and plotting strikes in a vacuum.

    “It’s the lone wolf who is our biggest concern,” said Jack Killeen, Safeguards and Security Division leader at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    Killeen and LANL Security Group Leader Mike Wismer discussed lone wolf terrorism during a recent interview.

  • Injured pedestrian recovers well

    Lois Coffin was one of the citizens attending last Tuesday night’s council debate concerning changes to Trinity Drive. Coffin had a personal interest in the issue: she was struck by a 16-year-old driving a pickup truck as she walked across Trinity Drive at Oppenheimer on July 26.

    After impact, Coffin saw the truck still coming toward her and managed to roll out of the way. One of the wheels was less than two feet from her head when the driver stopped. “I tried to stay focused when it happened,” Coffin said. “I just happened to be very lucky it wasn’t worse. Circumstances could so easily have been different.”

  • Animal Shelter 09-11-11

    The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of on-site adoptable pets; others are in foster care with loving, temporary homes.
    It’s summer, remember that pets also suffer when the temperature rises. Cooling animals (dogs, rabbits, cats) by giving them a “cool” bath or shower to help keep their body temperature down.
    A cool towel on a tile floor to lay on, a cool towel or washcloth laying over the skin, next to a fan will also help cool the animal.
    Make sure they have plenty of cool water to drink as well.
    Signs of heat stroke in a pet are: rapid panting, wide eyes, lots of drooling, hot skin, twitching muscles, vomiting and a dazed look. Call your vet if you think your pet has heat stroke.

  • La Leche League meeting

    La Leche League of Los Alamos will discuss, “Nutrition and Weaning” at their monthly meeting at 10 a.m. Monday in the Nursery at the United Church, 2525 Canyon Road.
     All interested, pregnant, or breastfeeding women are welcome to learn and share, through mother-to-mother support, the basics and benefits of breastfeeding. A lending library with books and audio tapes concerning childbirth, breastfeeding, parenting and nutrition is available. Nursing babies and toddlers who have difficulty separating, are welcome.
    For more information, contact Cathleen at 661-4033 or Gina at 661-8740.

  • Youth Activity Center schedule 09-11-11

    Monday — H.O.R.S.E, basketball
    Tuesday — Group Jenga
    Wednesday —   Movies and  munchies
    Thursday — Bookmarks, arts and crafts
    Friday —   Coloring contest
     
    All children   promoted to third through eighth grade are welcome to join free of  charge.
    The  centers are  located at 475 20th Street (by Ashley Pond)  and  10 Sherwood Blvd., Piñon Park.
    Call 662-9412 or 672-1565 for information.

  • Parents and teachers just don’t understand

    The teenage dialect is often mocked by their parents’ generation. When they are busy ruminating on the decline in society, as evidenced by their children’s actions, the topic of modern language usage inevitably comes up.
    However, a careful examination of the language reveals that these critics simply do not understand the next generation of the English language. Like so many before them, they have labeled as evil that which they do not understand.
    First and foremost, there is the language of the electronic communication. Adults tirelessly mock the teenager’s uses of “4” in place of for, “u” in place of you, etc. However, these abbreviations came into widespread usage out of necessity, not laziness.

  • Tips that can help petites look taller

    Being petite is something that I have little experience with, but short people seem to dislike being vertically challenged. The fact that I’m not petite doesn’t mean that I can’t understand the negative feelings that some people experience in being short.
    Feeling short can cause insecurity and as a result, some petites tend to hide their bodies in oversized clothing. This is not the way to go. Mind you, very tall people can feel just as insecure as petites, but this article will focus on some peoples’ difficulty in accepting their height.