.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Government only helps

    Here’s the recipe for growing an economy:
    “The growth rate of real per capita output is the sum of the growth rate of real per capita labor input and productivity growth.
    Productivity … is determined by the technology and regulatory structure of the economy and therefore is largely independent of spending policies.”
    The good words come from two economists, Harold L. Cole of the University of Pennsylvania and Lee E. Ohanian of UCLA. Their essay appeared Sept. 26 in the Wall Street Journal.
    Growing real per capita labor input means more people working more. Doing more stuff and doing existing tasks more efficiently grows productivity.
    Companies are doing something about growing real per capita output.

  • Using Her Head

    Los Alamos’ Leslie Guarello heads a ball toward the Capital goal Saturday at Sullivan Field. Guarello finished Saturday’s match with three goals and an assist as the Hilltoppers routed the Jaguars 10-0.

    The Hilltoppers, the top-ranked team in the state, have a big nondistrict contest scheduled for Friday when they travel to Albuquerque to take on St. Pius X.

    A win in that contest would give the Hilltoppers virtually undisputed claim on the No. 1 seed in the Class 4A championship tournament, which starts later this month.

  • Beltre’s 3 homers lift Rangers over Rays

    ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (AP) — This is what Adrian Beltre envisioned when he signed with Texas in the offseason. Balls jumping off his bat in October, the Rangers making another run for the pennant.
    Beltre hit three straight home runs and the defending AL champions advanced again, beating the Tampa Bay Rays 4-3 in Game 4 Tuesday to win their playoff matchup.
    Beltre put on a power show that few players in major league history have matched, helping Texas take the best-of-five series and ending the Rays’ remarkable run to the wild-card spot. The Rangers next play the Detroit Tigers-New York Yankees winner.

  • Bob Visel shoots ace

    Bob Visel scored his first ace Sept. 20 at Los Alamos Golf Course.
    Visel, playing on the 122-yard eighth hole, picked up his ace hitting a pitching wedge.
    Witnessing the ace were Young Nilsen, John Stam and Eddie Sanchez.

  • Lobos come out flat as Aggies win 3-1

    LAS CRUCES — For sure, you have to give the Aggie their dues.
    After all, New Mexico State beat the Lobos three games out of four and used solid net work to grab a 3-1 win over New Mexico Tuesday night in the Pan American
    Center.
    But Lobo Coach Jeff Nelson also blamed another team for UNM’s loss to Aggies. He blamed the Lobos.
    “We came out with no intensity, really flat,” said Nelson of the 25-22, 25-18, 22-25, 25-17 loss to the Aggies in front of a crowd of 1,669. “They’re just not bringing it. They (the Aggies) outworked us. I think they wanted it a lot more than we did.”

  • Toppers, Sundevils to meet tonight

    The two top teams in the District 2-4A volleyball standings will face off tonight when Los Alamos’ Hilltoppers will take on Española Valley’s Sundevils.
    That match is scheduled for 6:30 p.m. at Edward Medina Gymnasium in Española.
    Heading into that contest, the Hilltoppers and Sundevils are tied for the 2-4A lead. Both teams sport 2-0 district records.
    Española Valley, which has been Los Alamos’ toughest district opponent for the last several seasons, will be heading into tonight’s contest on a roll. It has won three straight matches, including a 3-2 victory over Santa Fe Sept. 28 and a 3-1 win over Capital Saturday.

  • Perry raises over $17 million since mid-August

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Texas Gov. Rick Perry raised more than $17 million in his first seven weeks running for president, his campaign announced Wednesday, an impressive total that helps cement his status as the top alternative to Mitt Romney and counter the perception that his campaign his struggling.

    Perry has raised more than $17 million since August 13, and has $15 million in cash on hand.

    Perry immediately rose to the top of national polls after he announced his run, but his debate performances have been shaky and he's dropped back in recent surveys. His money haul shows his struggles aren't yet affecting his fundraising — though that won't become clear until the full fundraising reports are filed on Oct. 15.

  • Council taps Carlsbad exec as new county administrator

    The Los Alamos County Council voted last night to appoint Harry Burgess as the new county administrator, effective November 6. Burgess is currently the city administrator in the City of Carlsbad, and was selected after an extensive public input process this summer, followed by interviews two weeks ago with the four candidates for the top executive position at the county. The search for a new county administrator had been underway since February when the council hired Prothman Company, a national executive recruitment firm, to assist in the hiring process. 

  • Stocks edge higher as service sector grows

    NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks edged higher in early trading Wednesday after a trade group reported that the service sector grew in September. Private company hiring also increased.

    The Institute of Supply Management said its gauge of the U.S. service sector, which employs 90 percent of the work force, continued to grow slowly in September as well. The index measures the strength of health care, banking, real estate, and other businesses outside of manufacturing.

    Payroll processor ADP said private companies added 91,000 jobs last month. That was a slight gain from August. ADP's figures do not always predict what the government's broad employment report, which will be released Friday, but they can often influence traders' expectations.

  • Israeli wins chemistry Nobel for quasicrystals--video extra

    STOCKHOLM (AP) — Israeli scientist Dan Shechtman was awarded the Nobel Prize in chemistry on Wednesday for a discovery that faced skepticism and mockery, even prompting his expulsion from his research team, before it won widespread acceptance as a fundamental breakthrough.

    While doing research in the U.S. in 1982, Shechtman discovered a new chemical structure — quasicrystals — that researchers previously thought was impossible.

    He was studying a mix of aluminum and manganese in an electron microscope when he found the atoms were arranged in a pattern — similar to one in some traditional Islamic mosaics — that never repeated itself and appeared contrary to the laws of nature.