Today's News

  • Court allows GOP, Dem candidates on ballot

    SANTA FE  (AP) — New Mexico’s highest court ruled Tuesday that the Senate’s top leader and other candidates can appear on the ballot despite incomplete election paperwork.
    The decision by the state Supreme Court will permit Senate President Tim Jennings, a Roswell Democrat, and more than a half dozen other incumbent legislators to remain candidates although their nominating petitions failed to designate the political district of the office for which they are running.
    A 2011 state law required the district number for the first time on the petitions that candidates must submit when they file for an office. The petitions list signatures of registered voters and candidates must have a certain number of signatures to qualify for office.

  • SFNF to hold two public meetings

    The Santa Fe National Forest is hosting public meetings about the Southwest Jemez Mountains Landscape Restoration project and encourages the public to attend any of them.
    Forest managers wish to reduce the threat of high-intensity, potentially-destructive wildfires by restoring natural processes in the project area. A variety of treatments will be proposed including prescribed fires, mechanically thinning trees, improving watershed function and wildlife habitat, and removing invasive species.

  • Council tentative in its OK of salary plan

    The main issue facing the Los Alamos County Council last night was an amendment to the FY2012 compensation and classification plan and approval of the FY2013 compensation and classification plan.

    The county’s salaries are subject to annual review and job classifications must be reviewed every four years.

    Based on a 2010 market study, council had directed staff to reduce the number of job levels and titles, to consider restructuring the pay system with a philosophy based on market positioning and developing a method to deal with an increasing number of employees at the top of their pay range.

  • Board approves $5M bond sale

    The Los Alamos Public School Board unanimously approved Tuesday to allow the District to borrow $5 million.

    The borrowing is part of the remaining installment of the District’s 2009 $40 million incremental bond authorization.

    Board President Kevin Honnell said the money will be used to tear down sections of Los Alamos Middle School in June.

    He said the voters got a good deal on the bond too. The interest on the bond will be 1.76 percent – the lowest rate the District has ever received on a bond issue.

    “I’m glad to get a good return,” he said.

    There were ten bids on the bond. The lowest bid came from FTN Financial Markets out of Tennessee.

  • Thank You 04-11-12

    Thank you, Steve and Judi Brownell, for all the memories

    March 30 was a bittersweet day for the Los Alamos community and the Brownells.
    This is the day that Steve and Judi Brownell closed Brownell’s Hallmark store. We are happy for them because they can now retire, move close to their children/grandchildren and enjoy life. We are also very sad to see them go.  
    Brownell’s Hallmark was not just a store, it was a memory maker.  
    Shortly after they bought the Hallmark store, they had an open house for Easter and allowed the local children to take their photo with the Easter Bunny.

  • Make a Difference

    Los Alamos Public Schools is working with Bernadette Lauritzen, of Champions of Youth Ambitions (C’YA) to assist with the application process for the 100 Best Communities for Young People, through America’s Promise.
     Los Alamos received this recognition in an effort spearheaded by Vanessa de los Santos, (of the Coffee Booth). The process will once again be assisted by the Los Alamos Chamber of Commerce.
    The effort is asking anyone that offers a program or opportunity for youth (of any age) to email information about their programs, with a point of contact.  
    The community can send information as soon as possible or leave messages at the contact information below:
    Lauritzens@att.net or 661-4846.

  • Morris to speak at MOWW meeting

    Chris Morris of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Proton Radiography Program will speak at the April 17 dinner meeting of the Major Gen. Franklin E. Miles Chapter 229 of the Military Order of World Wars.
    The meeting will be at the Best Western Hilltop House Hotel, third floor and will begin with a social period at 6 p.m., followed by a brief business meeting and dinner at 6:25 p.m. Morris’ talk will begin at about 7:15 p.m.
    The dinner entrée is chicken parmesan on bed of fettuccini, with vegetables, garlic bread and salad. Cost of the dinner is $23 per person.

  • Nonsense can be stunning

    Sometimes the amount of dissembling nonsense thrown at us is just stunning. Metaphorically stunning, that is.
    Some Department of Transportation genius decided to cite people supporting pilgrims making the Holy Week walk to El Santuario de Chimayo if the supply stands happen onto highway right-of-way. Safety was the excuse.
    A recent report (“The Economist,” Feb. 18) discussed the Obama administration’s “generous use of ancillary benefits, or ‘co-benefits’” and “private benefits” in proclaiming the bounteous gains from new regulations. The issues cover so-called gains from a regulation directed at something else.

  • Accion helps launch new business

    A new brewery is coming to Albuquerque in June, run by three local beer-loving entrepreneurs. Bosque Brewing is the brainchild of partners Jotham Michnovicz, Kevin Jameson and Gabe Jensen and in their corner is nonprofit lender Accion, which extended a loan of $100,000 to help the partners build a brew house and cover their initial operating expenses.
    The idea for the brewery started two years ago, before any of the partners had ever made a batch of home brew, Jameson said. The three were united by longtime friendships, one family tie — Michnovicz and Jenson are cousins — and membership in the same church. All three attended New Mexico State University in Las Cruces.

  • True’s run will continue in 2013

    ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — An ultra-marathon that honors the running traditions of a Mexican tribe will go on next year, even though its founder died last month in southwestern New Mexico.
    Ultra-runner Micah True’s body was found March 31 after he failed to return from a routine run. His agent, Scott Leese, says a foundation and memorial fund have been created to honor the 58-year-old.
    Leese says the Caballo Blanco Foundation will focus on True’s support for the indigenous Tarahumara of Mexico, their running traditions and the annual 50-mile-plus ultra-marathon through Copper Canyon. Nicknamed Caballo Blanco, True started the race in 2003 as a way to highlight the Tarahumara’s extreme running prowess.