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Today's News

  • Youth embrace teen center concept

    The interim Teen Center, “The Hilltop Spot,” opened in the basement of Trinity on the Hill Episcopal Church in March. According to Director Michelangelo Lobato’s report to council last week, the center is providing value to the community.

    The county has allocated $150,000 for a Phase I Capital Improvement Program project conceptual study for a new teen center facility. Since that project could take years to reach approval and completion, the Juvenile Justice Advisory Board  and the YMCA proposed operating a teen center on an interim basis, which would provide services to teens immediately and, if successful, demonstrate the benefits of a new facility.

  • Details about second truck crash on NM 4 emerge

    More details emerged about the crash of the second semi truck that lost its haul of crushed cars on N.M. 4 on Friday.

    The crash closed the road for the second straight day heading into the Jemez Mountains, causing headaches for those commuting and vacationing in the area.

    The second crash occurred at the first hairpin turn on N.M. 4 before the West Jemez intersection.
    Los Alamos police officer Albert Rael was first on the scene and he first talked with the driver of the truck, Miguel Machain Espinoza.

    Rael asked Espinoza how the accident happened.

    According to the narrative from the police report, Espinoza said he was going around the turn about 2 mph and he was trying to use as much of the road as possible.

  • Solyndra isn't the whole story

    In the utility room of a wealthy homeowner was a Rube Goldberg-like solar system, impossibly complex. It wasn’t working. In the 1970s, it was my first solar story.
    We’ve come a long way, baby. Now they work, and the biggest obstacle – cost – is going away. Good ol’ American know-how would have risen to the challenge, eventually, but the Chinese beat us to the punch.  

  • NBA cancels early-season games

    NEW YORK (AP) — Two weeks of NBA games are lost. Many more could be in jeopardy.
    There’s a “gulf” that separates owners and players, and they will have to close it quickly to avoid further damage to the schedule.
    Sticking to his deadline, Commissioner David Stern wiped out the first two weeks of the season — exactly 100 games — after more than seven hours of negotiations Monday failed to produce a new labor deal and preserve the Nov. 1 season openers.
    The cancellations mark the NBA’s first work stoppage since the 1998-99 season was reduced to 50 games.

  • Raiders facing uncertain future

    ALAMEDA, Calif. (AP) — The Oakland Raiders will have to replace much more than an owner now following Al Davis’ death.
    He was the general manager who hand-picked many of the current members of the Raiders. He was the master technician whose football philosophies are still adhered to by the team more than three decades after he coached his last game. He was the iconic figure who turned his beloved franchise into a global brand whose silver-and-black colors are recognized around the world.
    Most of all, Davis was the driving force behind a franchise that won three Super Bowl titles and was one of the most successful in pro sports until falling on hard times the past decade.

  • LA falls by 4 points to Santa Fe

    The Los Alamos Hilltopper C team football squad led for much of the way Monday against the Santa Fe Demons but some costly late turnovers helped the Demons get on track.
    In the fourth quarter, the Hilltoppers had a snap go over the punter’s head into the end zone, which was recovered by Santa Fe.
    On the next offensive series for the Hilltoppers, the Demons intercepted a pass and ran it back for a touchdown, giving it a four-point advantage.
    The quick two scores by Santa Fe helped it come back to win Monday’s game 26-22 at Sullivan Field.

  • LA girls top Raton to win at Capital, LA boys finish fifth

    The Los Alamos girls golf team held off Raton to take the top honors in the Capital City Invitational tournament, while a pair of Hilltoppers picked up qualification legs for the state tournament.
    The Hilltopper boys and girls competed in the Capital City tournament at Santa Fe Country Club Monday. In all, six boys teams competed in Monday’s event. In the girls event, five girls teams were scheduled to compete, but two teams showed up with only five players, while the fifth had a player disqualified and wasn’t eligible for the team title.
    Los Alamos’ Aislinn McDonald and Emma Haines both shot well enough to grab state qualification legs Monday. McDonald finished with a score of 92 and Haines fired a 93.

  • Bachmann slides ideas into 11-point economic plan

    ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — Searching for a campaign boost, Republican presidential candidate Michele Bachmann attached a catchy slogan Tuesday for a newly packaged 11-point proposal for repairing the U.S. economy.

    Her "American Jobs, Right Now" framework calls for tax accommodations that would give companies incentive to re-invest at home money that presently is earned abroad. She also would decrease government worker salaries, eliminate an inheritance tax and roll back a slate of federal regulations. That includes repeal of President Barack Obama's signature health law.

  • 7 survive 20 hours at sea clinging to boat, cooler--video extra

    MARATHON, Fla. (AP) — Eight relatives had set out to fish in less-than-ideal conditions off the Florida Keys. It was raining, seas topped 7 feet and winds were whipping up to 38 mph.

    Before they knew it, two waves hit, capsizing their anchored 22-foot boat and knocking them into the sea about 3 1/2 miles offshore Saturday. Seven, including a 4-year-old, survived by clinging to their capsized vessel and a small blue cooler for nearly 20 hours, suffering exhaustion, jellyfish stings and hypothermia. A 79-year-old woman, the matriarch of the group, was missing and presumed drowned.

  • Lab finishes demolition of former admin building--video extra

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has completed demolition of its former Administration Building. Demolition of the 316,500-square-foot building that was home to seven Laboratory directors was completed five months ahead of the original schedule and significantly under budget.

    “After we removed all regulated, hazardous materials such as asbestos, our team was able to recycle about 95 percent of the building,” said Darrik Stafford, LANL’s project director for the demolition.

    “At more than 300,000 square feet, this was a sizable undertaking,” added John Gallegos of the National Nuclear Security Administration’s Los Alamos Site Office. “I am pleased with the results of this project.”