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Today's News

  • Baby died of brain disorder

    Ten months after 11-day-old Grey Vigil of Los Alamos died, the Office of the Medical Investigator has released its autopsy report. The infant was born with a rare brain disorder called hydranencephaly, according to the report, which typically causes death within one year.  

    Baby Grey’s mother, Katrina Vigil, has been a suspect in her baby’s death as early police reports indicated that she hid the newborn in a closet for three days to conceal his birth on Sept. 24.

    Her attorney, John W. Day of Rothstein, Donatelli, Hughes, Dahlstrom, Schoenburg &  Bienvenu, LLP addressed the OMI’s findings in an interview this morning from his Santa Fe office.

  • Perils of New Mexico's GOP Senate Primary

    By this time next year, New Mexico Democratic and Republican voters will have chosen their nominees for the U.S. Senate seat being vacated by Sen. Jeff Bingaman, the Democrat who was first elected to that seat in 1982.
    Chances are Dems will have settled on either 1st Dist. Congressman Martin Heinrich or state Auditor Hector Balderas.
    Republicans, in turn, will likely have opted for Heather Wilson, a former 1st Dist. Congresswoman, or Lt. Gov. John Sanchez, although two lesser-known GOP hopefuls, Greg Sowards and Bill English, are also running.

  • Getting virtual learning right

    Expanding virtual learning opportunities  is a critically important step for New Mexico.
    Virtual schooling was a critical component of the “Florida Model” for education reform, which helped transform achievement across student sub-groups there from nearly worst to first within a decade.
    The Florida Reform model has since been adopted by Gov. Susana Martinez — with good reason.
    Academic outcomes indicate the state’s traditional schooling system is not up to the task.
    New Mexico ranks 49 in fourth-grade reading proficiency; 48 in eighth-grade math proficiency; and 50 in graduation rates. Poor funding does not explain such poor performance.

  • NFL players, owners reach deal

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Let’s talk Peyton Manning touchdown passes, not antitrust lawsuits.
    Finally, 4½ months after the NFL’s first work stoppage in 24 years, Commissioner Roger Goodell could say the words fans awaited: “Football’s back.”
    With a frenzy.
    Goodell and NFL Players Association head DeMaurice Smith both used that phrase Monday while announcing their agreement on a 10-year deal to end the lockout that began in March.
    Players could report to team facilities today for physicals, meetings and to pick up playbooks. Training camps begin on Wednesday for 10 teams, with the other 22 starting workouts throughout the rest of the week.

  • Norman storms back to win title

    Curt Norman posted the best score of the 2011 City Championship tournament Sunday to claim his second consecutive title.
    Norman, who was a shot behind day one leader Ted Ball heading into Sunday’s second round, posted a 4-under 68 to run away with the 2011 title. Norman finished with a two-day total of 143, easily outdistancing Ball.
    Ball, who had the low round of 74 on a generally high-scoring round Saturday, finished Sunday’s round with a 6-over 78 on his attempt to win his first ever City title. His two-day total of 152, however, was still good enough for second place.

  • Colby wins playoff to claim senior men's crown

    John Stam had the second-low round of the entire tournament Sunday to get himself back in contention in the senior men’s City Championship, but Brian Colby held on to take the 2011 title.
    Colby won a playoff over 2010 senior men’s champion Reid Griffith to take the 2011 City title. Colby and Griffith both finished with a two-day total of 150 shots.
    Following Saturday’s first day of the tournament, Colby was down one stroke to Griffith, but pulled even with Griffith Sunday with his round of 76. Griffith finished with a 77 Sunday.

  • Martinson wins third straight City tournament

    Tami Martinson took a solid lead after the opening round of the City Championship tournament and hung on through the second round to win her third straight title.
    Martinson, who is on an exceptional run at the City tournament, shot a total of 165 this weekend, holding off a charge Sunday from Ev Griggs.
    Griggs, the most decorated amateur golfer in Los Alamos County history and an 18-time winner of the City tournament, had a solid round of 82 Sunday to get within striking distance, but Martinson’s 84 gave her a three-stroke victory.
    In the past three City tournaments, Martinson has won with solid numbers.
    Martinson earned a five-shot win in 2010 and picked up a whopping 14-shot victory 2009, in which she broke 80 both days.

  • SF man busted for taking lewd photos at department stores

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — A Santa Fe man has been arrested on suspicion of voyeurism after police say he was taking up-skirt photos of several unsuspecting women and a child with his cell phone at area department stores.

    Police arrested 30-year-old Henry Torcida-Montero Friday and booked him on 13 counts of voyeurism.

    Police Lt. Louis Carlos tells the Santa Fe New Mexican Torcida-Montero would choose someone he wanted a photograph of and would hang around the immediate area and snap the picture with his cell phone and then would walk away.

    Torcida-Montero was caught on a Kmart surveillance system walking behind several women and taking photos with his cell phone.

  • Rival plans ensnarl Congress over debt ceiling--video extras

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Rival Democratic and Republican plans to raise the government's borrowing ability have thrust Congress into a standoff just one week away from a potentially devastating debt crisis. President Barack Obama made a last ditch call for compromise, but House Speaker John Boehner said negotiations with the White House had been futile.

    "We can't allow the American people to become collateral damage to Washington's political warfare," Obama declared Monday in a prime-time address to the nation.

  • Wealth gap widens between whites, minorities

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The wealth gaps between whites and minorities have grown to their widest levels in a quarter-century. The recession and uneven recovery have erased decades of minority gains, leaving whites on average with 20 times the net worth of blacks and 18 times that of Hispanics, according to an analysis of new Census data.