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Today's News

  • Smoke and twitches

    It can’t happen again! Not so soon. I just don’t know if I have the strength to go through this again.
    If you were living in Los Alamos in 2001, you’ll now know what every cancer survivor goes through time and time again when there is a chance that their cancer is back.
    When the town was in danger of being devastated by fire again recently, you didn’t have to be a cancer survivor to understand the fear of recurrence.
    Whether it’s a high tumor marker, or a spot on a CAT scan, the fear can be debilitating and exhausting.
    Flashbacks, anxiety, not being able to concentrate, heart constantly racing. Sound familiar? Welcome to our world.

  • Public's right to know is evergreen

    Well, we’ve come full circle. Five years ago, Bill Richardson’s administration was asked for state e-mails about an audit of the driver’s license program.
    It refused, claiming executive privilege, and the Republican Party of New Mexico filed suit.
     This year, Secretary of State Dianna Duran was asked for state e-mails about a similar audit – a cross-check between drivers’ licenses and voter rolls. Duran’s office refused, citing executive privilege, and the American Civil Liberties Union of New Mexico has now filed suit.

  • BAER update

    - BAER Treatment Information -

  • Analysts: Senate plan saves $2.2 trillion

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Budget analysts said Wednesday that a Senate Democratic plan to reduce the deficit and increase the nation's borrowing authority would save $2.2 trillion over a decade, more than a rival House Republican proposal but less than promised. With both bills stuck in neutral, Congress, financial markets and the public remained on edge days before the deadline for heading off a potentially calamitous default.

  • Texas agriculture losses could set new record amid drought

    LUBBOCK, Texas (AP) — Randy McGee spent $28,000 in one month pumping water onto about 500 acres in West Texas before he decided to give up irrigating 75 acres of corn and focus on other crops that stood a better chance in the drought.

    He thought rain might come and save those 75 acres, but it didn't and days of triple-digit heat sucked the remaining moisture from the soil. McGee walked recently through rows of sunbaked and stunted stalks, one of thousands of farmers counting his losses amid record heat and drought this year.

  • South Korea landslides leave 32 dead, 10 missing--video extra

    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — A blast of heavy rain sent landslides barreling through South Korea's capital and a northern town Wednesday, killing at least 32 people, including 10 college students doing volunteer work.

    The students died as mud and debris engulfed them as they slept in a resort cabin in Chuncheon, about 68 miles (110 kilometers) northeast of the capital Seoul, said Byun In-soo of the town's fire station. A married couple and a convenience store owner also died.

  • Stock futures fall as debt stalemate continues

    NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stock futures fell Wednesday as lawmakers remain at odds over how to avoid a debt default. A weak report on long-lasting manufactured goods also weighed on stocks.

    House Speaker John Boehner had planned to hold a vote on his debt-limit plan on Wednesday. But that was postponed after conservative lawmakers scoffed at the proposal and congressional budget officials said it would have cut spending less than advertised. The White House had also threatened to veto Boehner's plan. A deal still appears a long way off.

  • LAYL application deadline extended

    Los Alamos Youth Leadership is accepting applications until July 31 from high school students for the 2011/12 school year. 
    LAYL is a youth-driven project-oriented program. Applications can be downloaded from the Juvenile Justive Advisory Board and Family YMCA websites, or students can pick up an application at the Family YMCA.

  • Get ready for back to school shopping

       This week, I wanted to touch base on — are you sitting down — back to school readiness. I really didn’t want to say it, but someone has to.
       If you are anything like me, that backpack hasn’t been opened since the day it came home in May and who knows what still remains in there.
       As the tax-free holiday for school shopping is upon us, there are some things you can ponder before the big event.
       I highly recommend taking the pants out of the closet or drawer for your student. It never fails; I see kids in elementary school with pants a good four to six inches too short for them.

  • A trip back in time

    An impromptu mobile museum cropped in the Chamber of Commerce parking lot on July 12. The drivers from all over the United States, stopped by to visit and show off their rides to Los Alamos residents.