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Today's News

  • People in the News 01-22-12

    The University of Dallas Department of Education has recognized Elise Dinehart, a senior from Los Alamos, with its 2012 Teller Award, an award established by alumni and faculty in honor of Professor Emeritus James D. Teller. The award is given each year to an outstanding student based upon scholastic achievement, leadership ability and potential as a teacher.
    “Elise exemplifies the qualities of scholarship, leadership and the intangible characteristics found in a great teacher,” said Education Professor and Department Chair Jerry Irons. “A model of strength, dedication, tenacity and tenderness, she will truly affect the future through her teaching.”

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  • Reign in the Dragon

    While millions of Americans have moved into the recovery phase of their holiday season, Jan. 23 marks the beginning of a festive time in Chinese culture. It would be easy to compare the holiday to the Christmas holiday of the Western world but, although there are many similarities, it is a celebration steeped in tradition, folklore and optimism.
    Commonly referred to as Spring Festival or Lunar New Year, the Chinese New Year is a time to celebrate warmer days with friends and family — a time of renewal, prosperity and good health for the year to come.

  • LACS presents Mozart’s ‘Grand Mass’

    The Los Alamos Choral Society and the Los Alamos Symphony Orchestra, under the direction of Dr. Mary Badarak,  presents the “Grand Mass in C minor, K. 427” by W.A. Mozart at 4 p.m. Jan. 29 at Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic Church, 3700 Canyon Dr.
    The performance features a chorus of 75 voices and an orchestra of 40 musicians. Cindy Little is the pianist-accompanist for the LACS and organist for this performance.

  • Give home businesses a break

    All you people who work from home, listen up. Somebody thinks you’re important.
    The governor has suggested reducing or eliminating the gross receipts tax on small businesses with a gross receipts tax liability of less than $200 a month – about half of the 80,000 businesses in the state.
    One of those businesses is mine. Wow! I was as happy to hear about a tax break as I was  to learn there are 40,000 of us out here.
    Who are we? We’re writers, consultants, bookkeepers, caterers, travel agents, website designers – you name it – and we work from home to minimize overhead.
    Critics have pointed out that if the governor’s goal is to create jobs, this slice of the private sector is least likely to do it.

  • Perturbed about Trinity Site Project

    I was very perturbed several years ago when the county decided to go ahead with the Trinity Site Project; then I had high hopes that it would simply die quietly, and now that it came back to life, I am even more perturbed.
    Let me explain my reasons why I am totally opposed to a resumption of this endeavor.
    Years ago this county created a master plan for the development of downtown Los Alamos. This plan was modified on and off, but fundamentally remained intact. Each time the basic premise remained to center the development of downtown on the intersection between Central Avenue and 15th Street.

  • Council seeks RDC appointee

    The Los Alamos County Council is seeking letters of interest from a citizen interested in serving on the Regional Development Corporation (RDC) Board of Directors.
    The council is required under the RDC bylaws to appoint three Los Alamos County individuals to the Board to represent the community. There is currently one vacancy on the Board.
    The RDC is a non-profit, regional economic development organization focused on creating a diverse and sustainable economy, especially in Northern New Mexico. The RDC has a service area focusing primarily on Los Alamos, Rio Arriba, Santa Fe, and Taos, San Miguel, Mora and Sandoval counties. They oversee a number of small business orientated programs.

  • Former SF Archbishop Sanchez dead at 77

    ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — Former Santa Fe Archbishop Robert Fortune Sanchez, who became the nation’s first Hispanic bishop in 1974 and headed New Mexico’s largest Catholic diocese for nearly two decades before resigning over sex allegations, has died. He was 77.
    He was surrounded by his family when he died Friday in Albuquerque, said officials with the Archdiocese of Santa Fe. It did not release the cause of death but said Sanchez had been ill.
    “I ask for prayers for the repose of his soul and the comfort and consolation of his family members,” Archbishop Michael Sheehan said in a statement.

  • Leaders talk about texting dangers

    Eleven teenagers die daily across the nation in car accidents because drivers take their eyes off the road to send or receive text messages on their cell phones.

    A new study by researchers at Eastern Virginia Medical School in Norfolk found that driving while text messaging has become more hazardous and prevalent than talking on cell phones.

    The federal government now estimates that 30 percent of all crashes involve some type of driver distraction. Teen fatalities from their driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs also are on the rise.

    Concern for those escalating numbers prompted Los Alamos County police and fire chaplains Cheryl Ridlon and Jeff Eichorst to approach Police Chief Wayne Torpy with an idea.

  • Gender income disparity greatest in Los Alamos

    A comparison of paychecks indicates that it’s still a man’s world.
    On Numbers looked at the median earnings of men and women in 942 metropolitan and micropolitan areas, using data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2010 American Community Survey.
    The final score: Men outearn women in 941 markets. Women have the edge in only one place, the tiny micropolitan area of Clewiston, Fla.
    Among medium-sized markets, the income disparity among genders is the greatest in Los Alamos. Men in the community that is home to Los Alamos National Laboratory earn a median of $81,712, while women earn $41,392.
    In the Albuquerque area, median income for men is $38,372, while the median for women is $27,827.

  • LANL achieves wastewater milestone

    Millions of gallons of industrial wastewater will be recycled at Los  Alamos National Laboratory as the result of a long-term strategy to treat wastewater rather than discharging it into the environment.

    The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency, which issues permits for industrial and sanitary wastewater discharges, recently approved the removal of four more outfalls from the Laboratory’s permit. (An outfall is where wastewater from Lab operations is discharged down canyons.)  Only 11 outfalls remain, down from 141 in 1993.