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Today's News

  • Council ponders the future of Progress Through Partnering

    When Los Alamos County adopted a new set of strategic goals in 2005, the second highest priority was to improve intergovernmental relations. Progress Through Partnering (PTP) was one of the programs developed to implement that goal.

    With the Los Alamos National Laboratory Contract Change, also in 2005, the county received additional Gross Receipts Tax (GRT) revenues. Council decided to contribute some of the additional revenue to projects that would help neighboring communities as well as advance the county’s strategic goals.

  • Anti-nuke protesters busted as prayer vigil concludes

    Officers from the Los Alamos Police Department arrested five protesters at 12:45 p.m. Monday after they reportedly crossed into a secure area (Pajarito Corridor) on Los Alamos National Laboratory property.

    The protesters are part of the Trinity Nuclear Abolition organization out of Albuquerque. They told authorities that they wanted to get to the CMRR building to conduct a prayer vigil.

    “Los Alamos National Laboratory fully supports the right of peaceful assembly and fully supports the right to free speech,” LANL spokesman Kevin Roark said. “The laboratory routinely cooperates with activist organizations to facilitate protest activities on laboratory property, but will not tolerate illegal or unsafe actions.”

  • FDA issues graphic cigarette labels

    RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — In the most significant change to U.S. cigarette packs in 25 years, the Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday released nine new warning labels that depict in graphic detail the negative health effects of tobacco use.

    Among the images to appear on cigarette packs are rotting and diseased teeth and gums and a man with a tracheotomy smoking.

  • Crunch time looms as Biden-led budget talks resume

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner offered a bullish assessment Tuesday of the chances of success for Vice President Joe Biden and a bipartisan band of lawmakers trying to craft a deal to slash the federal budget and raise the debt limit.

    "We are going to avoid a default crisis, no doubt about that. It is not going to happen," Geithner told a group of business executives. "We are going to have a bipartisan deficit reduction framework. The question is what is going to be the shape of that framework."

  • Cycling: Calvert, Park are top finishers at 2011 Tour de LA

    It was again a tight finish in the top Tour de Los Alamos men’s category.
    The Tour de Los Alamos, celebrating its 39th year, was held Sunday on a 27-mile loop course winding from downtown Los Alamos, past the Back Gate, through White Rock and back up the Truck Route.
    Damian Calvert, one of the top cyclists in the state, who was nipped by just one second in the 2010 Tour, came out on top in a photo finish against Ryan Blickem. Calvert and Blickem tied to the hundredth of a second in the men’s pro/1/2/3 divison.
    Calvert, who just a week earlier won the Pajarito Punishment, won his first Tour de Los Alamos since 2007. Calvert’s winning time was 3 hours, 40 minutes, 8 seconds on the three-lap, 81-mile course.

  • DOE puts out request for WIPP management contract

    CARLSBAD, N.M. (AP) — The Department of Energy is taking bids for management of the federal government's nuclear waste repository in southeastern New Mexico.

    Contractor Washington TRU Solutions LLC currently oversees the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in Carlsbad, where plutonium-contaminated waste from defense projects is buried in rooms excavated in vast underground salt beds. It's contract was extended last year through 2012.

    DOE says it anticipates awarding a five-year contract with an annual value of $135 million a year and an option for a five-year extension.

  • Judge approves settlement over Indian royalties

    WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal judge on Monday approved a $3.4 billion settlement over mismanaged Indian royalties in a case that represents the largest settlement ever approved against the U.S. government.

    Elouise Cobell of Browning, Mont., claimed in the 15-year-old suit that for more than a century, U.S. officials systematically stole or squandered billions in royalties intended for American Indians in exchange for oil, gas, grazing and other leases.

    U.S. District Judge Thomas Hogan, in approving the settlement after a daylong hearing, said the legitimacy of Cobell's claims could not be questioned.

    "The government mismanaged these resources on a staggering scale," Hogan said.

  • Crews fight Santa Fe fire, more bans imposed in NM

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Firefighters banked on cooler temperatures and slightly less gusty winds Monday for help in slowing wildfires burning around New Mexico, as the state's top land manager issued an open-ended ban to prevent fires on millions of acres of state trust land.

    The ban announced Monday by Land Commissioner Ray Powell was simple and straight forward: No fireworks, open fires or smoking until further notice.

    The ban covers the state's 13 million acres, or more than 20,300 square miles, of trust land.

  • Five anti-nuke protesters arrested attempting to breach LANL security

    Officers from the Los Alamos Police Department arrested five protesters at 12:45 p.m. today after they crossed into a secure area (Pajarito Corridor) on Los Alamos National Laboratory property.

    LANL and Department of Energy badge holders are the only people allowed access to the secured area.

    The protesters are part of the Trinity Nuclear Abolition organization out of Albuquerque. They told authorities that they wanted to get to the CMRR building to conduct a prayer vigil.

    The five individuals arrested had crossed into the secure area after being warned against that action by LANL representatives.

  • NM lawmakers start the task of redistricting

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — A legislative panel plans to travel across the state in July and August to seek public comment on proposals for drawing new boundaries of New Mexico's three congressional districts.

    One of those proposals would combine the cities of Rio Rancho and Albuquerque into a revised 1st Congressional District. Republican-leaning Rio Rancho currently is in the heavily Democratic 3rd District of northern New Mexico.

    Democrats hold the 1st and 3rd district seats.