Today's News

  • The finger of blame points at We the People

    Since Republicans took control of the U.S. House of Representatives a year ago come January, the American people have endured an unrelenting orgy of finger pointing.
    Divided government fosters that sort of thing. When one party controls the White House and the other party controls Congress, or a part thereof, deadlock is rarely far behind. And since no one wants to take responsibility for grinding the affairs of state to a halt, everyone starts pointing fingers of blame at everyone else.
    Witness last week when that so-called congressional “Super Committee” confirmed that the six Republicans and six Democrats on that panel had failed to find a way to reconcile their differences over how to reduce our horrendous national debt.

  • Church Listings 12-02-11

    Baha’i Faith
    For information, e-mail losalamosla@gmail.com. For general information, call the Baha’i Faith phone at 1-800-228-6483.

    Bethlehem Lutheran
    Bethlehem Evangelical Lutheran Church, a member of the ELCA, 2390 North Road, 662-5151; see a map at www.bethluth.com. Bruce Kuenzel, pastor. Worship services are at 8:15 a.m. and 10:45 a.m., with coffee and doughnuts served between services during our Education Hour. The preaching is biblical, the music is lively, children are welcome and abundant, and a well-staffed nursery is provided. All are welcome! Come Join the Family!
    Bryce Ave. Presbyterian

  • Bible Answers: Learning to 'turn the other cheek'

    “I can’t figure how to ‘turn the other cheek’ without being walked on.” — Katie

    “Turning the other cheek” is a radical departure from our “normal” response to insult. Most of us are inclined to want to slap in return.
    Why would Jesus say that the “normal” response (even if it is justified) should not only be resisted, but should be replaced with an offer of the other cheek — and why would He make this one of his important points in the “Sermon on the Mount” (Mt. 5:38-42)?
    Consider these truths:
    Anger and revenge will get you nowhere. They only incite more anger and retaliation. Better, he said, to stop the anger cycle before it goes any further.

  • Winds clocked at 88 mph at Sandia tram

    ALBUQUERQUE (AP)— Some of the worst winds to hit the Albuquerque metro area were at the base of the Sandia Tram. It was enough to shut the tram down Thursday after winds of 88 mph were clocked.
    The tramway manager says when the winds start swinging the cables and the cars, the tram can’t reach the mountaintop on a day like that.
    Once the cross winds go beyond 45, the tramway is shutdown. Inside their control room they monitor the wind speeds.
    It’s bad news for visitors and not so good for the tram because of lost business.
    This morning, meanwhile, state highway officials have closed Interstate 40 from Santa Rosa to Clines Corners due to black ice.

  • Update 12-02-11

    Historic meeting

    The Fuller Lodge Historic District Advisory Board will meet at 5 p.m., Dec. 7 in the Curtis Room.

    County Council

    The Los Alamos County Council will meet at 7 p.m., Dec. 6 at council chambers in the Community Building.

    Court closed

    The Magistrate Court will close Wednesday, Thursday and Dec. 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 for computer training for the judge and staff. Anyone who has court business may come to the court before or after those closing dates.

    LTAB meeting

    The Lodgers Tax Advisory Board will meet at 1 p.m., Dec. 13 at the Chamber Conference Room.

    TEDx meeting

  • Correction 12-02-11

    A press release in Thursday’s edition of “Diversions” incorrectly stated that Don Taylor will take photographs during the Santa Paws event from noon-4 p.m. Saturday at Pet Pangaea. Pet Pangaea will take the photos.

  • Time to get your tree

    Another trailer full of holiday spirit arrives at Delancy Street’s annual Christmas tree lot outside the Elk's Lodge Friday morning.

  • School officials fear more funding cutbacks

    Los Alamos Public Schools was tasked with trimming $600,000 from its budget this year and may be in for even more cuts.

    A meeting of the state Legislative Finance Committee, next week at the State Capitol, will determine if the budget issue will go to the Legislature during its upcoming session. The action has come about after the LFC and the Legislative Education Study Committee did a study on revising the school funding formula.

  • Stay healthy and be safe during extreme cold or snowy weather

    Check weather conditions before heading outdoors. That includes wind chill, which can greatly impact your body temperature.

    The wind chill is based on the rate of heat loss from exposed skin caused by combined effects of wind and cold. As the wind increases, heat is carried away from the body at an accelerated rate, driving down the body temperature. Animals are also affected by wind chill.

    During severe cold weather conditions, your best line of defense is to stay inside your home or vehicle.

    However, if you must be outside, avoid overexertion — such as shoveling heavy snow, pushing a car, or walking in deep snow. The strain from the cold and the hard labor may cause a heart attack. Sweating could lead to a chill and hypothermia.

  • Lab names new weapons boss

    Los Alamos National Laboratory Director Charlie McMillan announced the selection of Bret Knapp as the new principal associate director for Weapons Programs Thursday.  Knapp has been acting in that position since June 2011 when McMillan left the post to become laboratory director.

    As the head of LANL’s Weapons Programs, Knapp is responsible for the leadership, development, and execution of the Laboratory’s primary mission: ensuring the safety, security, and effectiveness of the U.S. nuclear arsenal. The programs have a $1.5 billion annual budget that is split between two directorates with a workforce of more than 1,400.