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Today's News

  • Topes Notes 04-14-11

    Isotopes hold on to top I-Cubs, 10-7

  • Baseball: Bonds guilty on one count of obstruction

    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Just like the whole Steroid Era: We’ll never really know.
    Even the one charge that left Barry Bonds a convicted felon didn’t specify steroids.
    Instead, a federal court jury found the home run king guilty of obstruction of justice Tuesday for giving an evasive answer under oath more than seven years ago. Rather than say “yes” or “no” to whether he received drugs that required a syringe, Bonds gave a rambling response to a grand jury, stating: “I became a celebrity child with a famous father.”

  • Baseball/Softball: Toppers, Spartans square off Friday

    Both the Los Alamos Hilltopper baseball and softball teams are sitting atop the District 2-4A standings, but two big tests await both teams Friday.
    Los Alamos will host both a softball and baseball doubleheader against Bernalillo Friday. The doubleheaders will start at 3 p.m. at both Bomber Field on North Mesa and Overlook Park in White Rock.
    The circumstances are different in the two games, but should the teams sweep the Spartans Friday, both will take big steps to securing the 2011 district title.
    In baseball, Los Alamos and Bernalillo have met twice before this season, splitting those two contests. However, Los Alamos won the one that affected the district standings, holding off the Spartans 4-3 in Bernalillo March 30.

  • Ford expands recall of F-150 pickup to nearly 1.2M

    DETROIT (AP) — Under pressure from government safety regulators, Ford Motor Co. is expanding a recall of the popular F-150 pickup truck to include nearly 1.2 million vehicles that may have defective air bags.

    The additional recall, announced Thursday by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, covers trucks from the 2004 through 2006 model years. An electrical short can cause the air bags to deploy unexpectedly, in some cases injuring drivers.

    In February, Ford agreed to fix 150,000 of the trucks but resisted the government's wishes to recall all 1.2 million trucks that may have the problem.

  • Wind Advisory until 8 p.m. Thursday

    THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN ALBUQUERQUE HAS ISSUED A WIND ADVISORY... WHICH IS IN EFFECT FROM 8 AM THIS MORNING TO 8 PM MDT THIS EVENING.

    * LOCATION... MUCH OF NORTH CENTRAL TO NORTHWEST TO WEST CENTRAL NEW MEXICO... INCLUDING THE SAN JUAN... JEMEZ... AND WEST CENTRAL MOUNTAINS. THIS ALSO INCLUDES THE NORTHWEST PLATEAU AND HIGHLANDS... AS WELL AS THE LOWER CHAMA RIVER VALLEY.

    * WINDS... WEST WINDS OF 25 TO 35 MPH WITH GUSTS OF 45 TO 50 MPH.

    * TIMING... WINDS WILL CONTINUE TO INCREASE THROUGH THE MORNING WITH STRONG WINDS LASTING THROUGH THE EARLY EVENING. THE STRONGEST WINDS ARE EXPECTED BETWEEN 11 AM AND 6 PM.

    * VISIBILITY... MAY BE LOCALLY REDUCED TO 3 MILES OR LESS IN BLOWING DUST.

  • More people apply for unemployment benefits

    WASHINGTON (AP) — More people applied for unemployment benefits last week, the first increase in three weeks. Still, the broader trend points to a slowly healing jobs market.

    The government says applications for unemployment benefits rose 27,000 to a seasonally adjusted 412,000 for the week ended April 9. That left applications at their highest point since mid-February.

    Applications near 375,000 are consistent with a sustained increase in hiring. Applications peaked during the recession at 659,000.

    The four-week average of applications, a less volatile measure, rose to 395,750. However, applications have dropped about 6 percent over the past two months. At the same time, businesses have stepped up hiring.

  • AP-GfK Poll: Are your taxes fair? Most say yes

    WASHINGTON (AP) — For all the complaining this time of year, most Americans actually think the taxes they pay are fair.

    Not that they're cheering. Fewer people expect refunds this year than in previous years, a new Associated Press-GfK poll shows. But as Monday's filing deadline approaches, the poll shows that 54 percent believe their tax bills are either somewhat fair or very fair, compared with 46 percent who say they are unfair.

  • Budget pact barely touches current-year deficit

    WASHINGTON (AP) — A new budget estimate released Wednesday shows that the spending bill negotiated between President Barack Obama and House Speaker John Boehner would produce less than 1 percent of the $38 billion in promised savings by the end of this budget year.

    The Congressional Budget Office estimate shows that compared with current spending rates the spending bill due for a House vote Thursday would cut federal outlays from non-war accounts by just $352 million through Sept. 30. About $8 billion in immediate cuts to domestic programs and foreign aid are offset by nearly equal increases in defense spending.

  • Mom drives van into Hudson River, kills self, 3 children

    NEWBURGH, N.Y. (AP) — A woman upset with the father of her children packed her four youngsters into her minivan and drove into the frigid Hudson River, killing everyone except her 10-year-old son, who managed to roll down a window of the sinking vehicle and swim to shore.
    The dead youngsters ranged in age from 11 months to 5 years.
    A relative had called police Tuesday night to report a dispute at the home of Lashanda Armstrong, 25. Shortly afterward, she drove off a boat ramp several blocks away from her apartment in this struggling city 60 miles north of New York City.

  • Bonds guilty of obstruction of justice

    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Barry Bonds was convicted of obstruction of justice Wednesday but a jury failed to reach a verdict on three other counts that the home run king lied to a grand jury when he denied knowingly using steroids and human growth hormone.

    Following a 12-day trial and almost four full days of deliberation, the jury of eight women and four men could reach a unanimous verdict only on one of the four counts against Bonds. U.S. District Judge Susan Illston declared a mistrial on the others, a messy end to a case that put the slugger — and baseball itself — under a cloud of suspicion for more than three years.