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Today's News

  • NNSA, DOE award research grants

    The Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration and Office of Science announced that 46 research grants totaling $14 million have been awarded as part of the Joint Program in High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas.
    Contemporary advances in laser, particle beam and pulsed power technologies have made possible the creation of increasingly high energy density states in the laboratory. Studies of such states of matter are providing insights into fields ranging from astrophysics to fusion energy.
    Six of the grants went to scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory.
    “These awards demonstrate the strong and valuable partnership of NNSA and the Office of Science,” NNSA Administrator Thomas D’Agostino said. “The work funded will enhance and promote cutting edge research that supports the missions of both organizations. I want to personally congratulate the recipients of these awards for their dedication and leadership.”
    “The excellent coordination between NNSA and the DOE Office of Science is enabling us to leverage federal investments in research to advance our understanding of energy and matter,” Office of Science Director William Brinkman said.

  • Nuclear weapons pioneer dies in Chicago

    Julius Tabin, a member of Enrico Fermi’s personal team at the Trinity Site blast in 1945, died in Chicago of heart failure at the age of 92 last month.

    Tabin joined a small group of physicists working on the Manhattan Project, first at the University of Chicago and then at Los Alamos.

    As part of Fermi’s team, he assisted in a series of studies that included measuring the efficiency of the first atomic test blast.

    After the blast, Tabin rode in a lead-lined Sherman tank to ground zero to be the first to collect a core sample of earth for analysis. Due to exposure to excessive radiation while gathering this material, he was restricted from conducting further physics research for an extended period.

    According to the Chicago Tribune, he turned to the law, where his background in physics and his contacts with other pioneers of the atomic age made him the go-to attorney for those who began to form companies in the new industry of nuclear energy.

    “With all those personal contacts, he was quite a rainmaker for the firm,” said Jim Schumann, now of counsel to the intellectual property law firm of Fitch, Even, Tabin & Flannery, where Tabin practiced for 56 years before retiring in 2006.

  • Civil Air Patrol teen gets his wings

    It was a very proud moment for the Salmon family as their son Austin, went up to receive the pre-solo wings he achieved at glider encampment earlier this summer.

    Pre-solo in a glider means that though there’s an instructor in the plane, the instructor lets the pilot do all the flying.

    Salmon received his training, which took place in Hobbs in Late June, early July, in an L-23 glider.

    Salmon’s next step is to get his solo flight wings for glider before moving on to powered flight. Just 16, Salmon has set his sights on perhaps working for Spaceport America as a commercial pilot.

    “I’d really like to be a commercial pilot for a private space company here in New Mexico."

    Not surprisingly, Salmon’s fascination with flight started long before he joined Los Alamos’ Civil Air Patrol two-and-a-half years ago.

    “I’ve been interested in flight my whole life,” Salmon said. “I was totally mesmerized by airplanes; something about them just clicked with me.”

  • Some oppose pond plan

    Despite being notably absent during several public meetings leading to the approval of the conceptual design for the Ashley Pond Park renovations project, a handful of residents attended the 30 percent design meeting Thursday to protest a key conceptual element: the location of a new stage.

    Council candidate Kristin Henderson was the most vocal of a group of five people opposed to the location of the stage — extending over the southeast corner of the pond, with the grassy slope for audience seating and a 20-foot concrete area for dancing. The stage would have a removable cover that would be used only during events.

    Those voicing opposition said there would be no shade in the new location — George Radnovich, a principal of Sites Southwest, LLC, suggested that parks and recreation could remedy that with tree plantings — that the dance space would interfere with walking around the pond and would not be large enough and that it would be too difficult to put chairs on the slope. There were also fears that the space would be too confined.

  • Church Listings 09-21-12

    Baha’i Faith
    For information, e-mail losalamosla@gmail.com. For general information, call the Baha’i Faith phone at 1-800-228-6483.

    Bethlehem Lutheran
    Bethlehem Evangelical Lutheran Church, a member of the ELCA is at 2390 North Road. 662-5151, bethluth.com. Worship services are at 8:15 and 10:45 a.m., with coffee and doughnuts served between services during our Education Hour of classes for all ages. The preaching is biblical by our Pastors Bruce Kuenzel and Nicolé Ferry, the music is lively, children are welcome and abundant and a well-staffed nursery is provided.  All are welcome. Come Join the Family.

    Bryce Ave. Presbyterian
    The church is located at 3333 Bryce Ave. The Rev. Henry Fernandez preaches, bapca.org, info@bapca.org. For information, call 672-3364.

    Buddhist
    Kannon Zendo, 35 Barranca Road. kannonzendo.org. Henry Chigen Finney, 661-6874. Meditation in the Zen tradition will be offered Wednesday evenings at the Kannon Zendo in Los Alamos.

    Calvary Chapel
    Sunday school classes for all ages at 9:15 a.m. Join us at 10:30 a.m. for worship and a study of the Biblical Jesus as He relates to people in our look at the Gospel of Exodus.

    The Christian Church

  • Ask Fr. John: Explaining spiritual versus religious beliefs

    Is Orthodoxy “religious” or “spiritual.” — Anonymous

    Part 1
    It depends on how you understand the words “religious” and “spiritual.” I hear so frequently the sentiment that one is “spiritual, not religious.” Really? Orthodox too! At least according to the more classical definition of “religion.”
    The word “religion” implies a movement of humanity toward God or “the greater.” Thus, religion becomes a matter of human persons searching out and discerning God or  the “higher things,” via personal experience. In other words, humanity tries to figure out “god.”
    In Orthodox Christianity, we believe that God is on the approach to us and that he has revealed himself to us. In order to demonstrate my point, I need to articulate some of our beliefs.
    The Orthodox gathering of believers believe that God has revealed to humanity how he has existed from eternity as Trinity.
    We believe that God, in order to more perfectly reveal himself and actually restore us back to himself, became a human man while remaining God. This was the God-man named Jesus Christ, God the Son of God the Father.

  • The time to plan is now

    If you’re like most people, your plans for retirement include spending more time with your family, traveling, or catching up on hobbies and activities that have been put on hold during your working years. And, like most people, you’ve probably put money aside to fund your retirement. But what if your retirement suddenly includes an unexpected long-term care need?
    According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in their 2011 Medicare & You booklet, about 70 percent of people over age 65 will require long-term care services at some point. And, with advances in medical technology and healthier lifestyles, people are living longer than ever before.
    The government has made it clear; it cannot afford to fund the nation’s long-term care costs. In fact, Congress tightened the financial requirements to qualify for Medicaid, the federally and state-funded program for those who live at or below the poverty level. And, recently rolled out a nationwide long-term care awareness program called “Own Your Future” which encourages people to better understand and plan for long-term care.
    All of this can certainly present a significant challenge, but there is something you can do. Plan now.

  • Trickle-down tragedy hits all

    On Aug. 31, the National Debt hit the $16 trillion mark.  I’ve often remarked that if people really understood numbers, they would never allow the government to amass such a debt.  But hey, it’s just a number, right?
    Yeah, 16 trillion is a number.  It happens to be a big number.  Big.  Really big.  Really really big.
    But I really really don’t have enough space in this column to insert enough reallys to make my point.  Let’s just say it really really is really really darn big.
    The problem with big numbers is that our brains simply aren’t wired to comprehend them.  Really.
    For example, in the night sky you’ll see lots of stars (in New Mexico that is — don’t try this in New Jersey).  There’s something like 8,000 stars visible to the naked eye.
     But there are 200 billion stars in the Milky Way galaxy alone.  That number dwarfs the 8,000 we see at night.
     And 16 trillion?  Well, you would need 90 Milky Way galaxies to have 16 trillion stars.
    No, this doesn’t do it.  Our brains can’t easily visualize galaxies.  How about something smaller, like an eyelash?  Sixteen trillion eyelashes would weigh about 3,500 tons!

  • Sports Update 09-21-12

    KinderHoops program hosted by YMCA

    The Family YMCA of Los Alamos is accepting registrations for its KinderHoops basketball program.
    The introductory basketball program is for boys and girls ages 4-6.
    Practices and games are schedule twice per week starting Oct. 8. The season will run through Nov. 16.
    KinderHoops is designed to teach younger players the fundamentals of dribbing, passing and shooting.
    Price for participation is $45 for YMCA members, $60 for nonmembers. Financial assistance may be available from the United Way of Northern New Mexico.
    For more information, call 662-3100 or visit laymca.org.

  • LA’s C team tops Moriarty, 40-20

    The Los Alamos Hilltopper C team football team picked up its third win of the season Monday at Moriarty.
    Marcos Vigil scored four touchdowns for Los Alamos while the Hilltopper defense forced three turnovers as the team earned a 40-20 win.
    Lane Saunders also scored two touchdowns for Los Alamos, which has scored at least 40 points in all three of its victories this season.
    Los Alamos opened the season with a 44-14 win over St. Pius X, then followed that up with a 40-13 win over Albuquerque Academy. It dropped a 20-14 decision at St. Michael’s Sept. 10 before Monday’s win at Moriarty.
    Against Moriarty, cornerback Alex Delamarter picked off two passes to lead the defensive effort.
    Los Alamos will host Hope Christian Oct. 1.