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Today's News

  • Chimayo: Off the beaten path

    During Lent and particularly during Holy Week, thousands of pilgrims flock to El Santuario de Chimayó to profess their faith, do penance, or ask for help with various medical and personal issues.

  • Baseball: Late blast lifts 'Toppers to victory

    BERNALILLO — A big turning point in the season for the Los Alamos Hilltopper baseball team occurred about two weeks ago.
    Los Alamos, which had struggled through a tough nondistrict schedule to that point, played three of its best games of the season at a tournament in Farmington. While Los Alamos went just 1-2 in the tournament, the team seemed to kick its game up a notch.
    Should the Hilltoppers be looking to turn their fortunes around in 2011, they picked a good time to do it.
    Wednesday in its District 2-4A opener, Los Alamos manufactured runs when it needed to, then got a monster shot courtesy of Jared Mang in its final at-bat to grab a 4-3 victory against the Bernalillo Spartans at Coach Dave Rostro Baseball Complex.

  • Golf: Tiger is wounded but still very dangerous

    Depending on which side of “The Pond” you’re on, arguably the biggest event in the realm of golf is upon us once again.
    Monday begins the practice rounds at Augusta National, which hosts The Masters tournament.
    With the possible exception of St. Andrews, Augusta is the most storied course in golf. Augusta has hosted some of the most exciting (I’m using “exciting” in relative terms, of course) golf that has ever been witnessed.
    As a player I met a few years ago told me, “the grass is like carpet” at Augusta. There is little about the place that isn’t eye-catching, even for the non-golfer.

  • Gates: No ground troops in Libya while 'I am in this job'

    WASHINGTON (AP) — As the U.S. debates its future role in the Libyan conflict, Defense officials slammed the brakes on any broad participation Thursday, with Defense Secretary Robert Gates saying there will be no American ground troops in Libya "as long as I am in this job."

    Under withering congressional probing and criticism of an ill-defined mission to aid a rebel force that officials know little about, Gates and Joint Chiefs chairman Adm. Mike Mullen sketched out a largely limited role for the U.S. military going forward, with Gates saying some other country could train the rebels trying to oust strongman Moammar Gadhafi.

  • Radioactivity 10,000 times standard at Japan plant

    TOKYO (AP) — Officials with the company that operates Japan's tsunami-stricken nuclear plant say radioactive contamination in groundwater underneath a reactor has been measured at 10,000 times the government health standard.

    A spokesman for plant operator Tokyo Electric Power Co. says the company doesn't believe any drinking water supply is affected.

    Contaminated water has been pooling at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power complex since it was damaged by the devastating earthquake and tsunami. It has already leaked into the ocean.

  • Anastasio, D'Agostino testify at U.S. Senate

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – In testimony before the Strategic Forces Subcommittee of the Senate Armed Services Committee, National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Administrator Thomas D'Agostino Wednesday said President Obama’s FY 2012 Budget Request provides the resources required to invest in the future of the nuclear security enterprise, implement the president’s nuclear security agenda, and improve the way the NNSA does business.

  • Former inmate sues LAPD

    A former Los Alamos Detention Center inmate filed a lawsuit against the Los Alamos Police Department claiming he was roughed up by guards and police last July.

    Both civil and criminal suits are pending and are scheduled for April 28.

    Read the full story in today's Los Alamos Monitor. 

  • Unemployment stats reveal mixed bag on hiring front

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Fewer people applied for unemployment benefits last week, a sign that layoffs are dropping and companies may be stepping up hiring.

    The Labor Department said Thursday that the number of people seeking benefits dipped by 6,000 to a seasonally adjusted 388,000 for the week that ended March 26. That's the second decline in three weeks.

    Applications near 375,000 or below are consistent with a sustained increase in hiring. Applications peaked during the recession at 659,000.

    The four-week average of applications, a less volatile measure, rose to 394,250. Still, that figure has dropped by 35,500, or 8 percent, in the past eight weeks.

  • Low levels of radiation found in West Coast milk

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Low levels of radiation have turned up in milk samples from two West Coast states.

    Traces of radioactive Iodine-131 were found in milk in California and Washington, according to federal and state authorities who are monitoring for contamination as the nuclear crisis unfolds in Japan. But the officials say the levels are still 5,000 times below levels of concern.

    The Environmental Protection Agency and the Food and Drug Administration said Wednesday that radiation was found in a March 25 milk sample from Spokane, Wash. The California Department of Public Health said on its website that a similar result was found March 28 in San Luis Obispo County.

  • LA Firefighter calls it quits

    Firefighter Brandon Gore has resigned from the Los Alamos Fire Department.

    Gore was charged with indecent exposure in Bernalillo County in November. A judge in January sentenced him to six months of probation.

    Fire Chief Doug Tucker confirmed Gore's resignation today saying, "Brandon resigned for personal reasons."

    Read the full story in Thursday's edition of the Los Alamos Monitor.